Historical Cleveland, Ohio, Newspapers from 1800s-Today Online!

GenealogyBank has Cleveland, Ohio, newspapers online, dating back to 1845 and right up to today, to help you with your family research in “The Buckeye State.” That is more than a century and a half of content to help you uncover your family history and discover interesting facts about Cleveland’s past! Research thousands old news articles, obituaries, pictures and more to trace back your ancestry.

“The Forest City” was settled in 1796 and incorporated in 1814. Wherever American settlers went newspapers were sure to follow, and the Cleveland Plain Dealer’s first issue rolled off the press on 7 April 1845.

masthead, Cleveland Plain Dealer newspaper 7 April 1845

Masthead, Cleveland Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 7 April 1845

Here is a quick list to help you research your genealogy in the back files of Cleveland’s historical newspapers online:

Newspaper Coverage Collection
Aliened American 4/9/1853 – 4/9/1853 Newspaper Archives
Cleveland Gazette 8/25/1883 – 5/20/1945 Newspaper Archives
Plain Dealer 4/7/1845 – 5/31/1991 Newspaper Archives
Plain Dealer 8/2/1991 – Current Recent Obituaries
Plain Dealer, The: Web Edition Articles 10/15/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries

GenealogyBank has two search pages for Cleveland newspapers, one for its “Newspaper Archives” collection and one for “Recent Obituaries.”

Here is a link to the search page for the Cleveland digital newspaper archives, dating from 1845-1991: Cleveland Newspaper Archives.

GenealogyBank search page for Cleveland, Ohio, Newspaper Archives

GenealogyBank search page for Cleveland, Ohio, Newspaper Archives

Here is a link to the Cleveland recent obituaries archives, dating from 1991-today: Cleveland Recent Obituaries.

GenealogyBank search page for Cleveland, Ohio, Recent Newspaper Obituaries

GenealogyBank search page for Cleveland, Ohio, Recent Newspaper Obituaries

GenealogyBank’s Online Montana Newspaper Archives

Montana—“Big Sky Country”—is also known as “The Treasure State.” Montana officially became our 41st state in 1889, but there were newspapers published in Montana Territory decades before it achieved statehood.

photo of the Sun River in Montana

Photo: Montana’s Sun River. Credit: Wikipedia.

GenealogyBank has coverage of Montana’s newspapers spanning 1866 to Today. Dig in and find the stories about your family as they pioneered early America, including cowboys, miners, teachers and kids. Discover the truth about your Montana ancestry in news articles, obituaries, historical documents and more in GenealogyBank’s vast online newspaper archives.

Use this handy list of Montana newspapers to quickly navigate to your title of interest:

City Newspaper

Coverage

Collection

Anaconda Anaconda Standard

1/2/1898 – 12/31/1922

Newspaper Archives

Big Fork West Shore News

3/24/2009 – Current

Recent Obituaries

Bigfork Bigfork Eagle

7/16/2004 – Current

Recent Obituaries

Billings Billings Gazette

10/2/2009 – Current

Recent Obituaries

Bozeman Bozeman Daily Chronicle

6/4/1996 – Current

Recent Obituaries

Butte Butte Weekly Miner

1/2/1896 – 5/23/1901

Newspaper Archives

Columbia Falls Hungry Horse News

7/13/2004 – Current

Recent Obituaries

Helena Helena Independent

1/1/1898 – 12/31/1900

Newspaper Archives

Helena Montana Herold

5/4/1893 – 7/11/1901

Newspaper Archives

Helena Helena Weekly Herald

11/15/1866 – 11/25/1869

Newspaper Archives

Helena Montana Radiator

1/27/1866 – 10/13/1866

Newspaper Archives

Helena Independent Record

10/2/2009 – Current

Recent Obituaries

Kalispell Daily Inter Lake

9/23/2004 – Current

Recent Obituaries

Libby Western News

8/6/2004 – Current

Recent Obituaries

Missoula NewWest

3/10/2005 – Current

Recent Obituaries

Missoula Missoulian

10/2/2009 – Current

Recent Obituaries

Plains Clark Fork Valley Press

1/8/2008 – Current

Recent Obituaries

Polson Lake County Leader & Advertiser

12/3/2008 – Current

Recent Obituaries

Sidney Sidney Herald

1/12/2001 – Current

Recent Obituaries

Whitefish Whitefish Pilot

7/13/2004 – Current

Recent Obituaries

Genealogy Tools & Resources Review: Best Bang for Your Buck!

Introduction: Scott Phillips is a genealogical historian and owner of Onward To Our Past® genealogy services. In this guest blog post, Scott shows the method he uses at the end of each year to evaluate all the genealogy tools and resources he used, to help him prepare his genealogy budget for the new year.

About this time of year I go through my annual exercise of evaluating the benefits, or “bang-for-my-bucks,” that I derived from the money I spent on genealogy tools and resources during the past year to indulge all my family history pursuits. I do this as the first step toward building my genealogy tool budget for the upcoming year.

More Bang for Your Buck, Greensboro News and Record newpaper headline 5 August 1984

Greensboro News and Record (Greensboro, North Carolina), 5 August 1984, page 144

2013 is no exception and, due to a variety of reasons, I decided that I was going to adhere to the “brutally honest” approach in my genealogy tools and resources review.

Each year I make up a simple table and list all the genealogy software and website subscriptions I spent money on for family history research and write them down in the far left-hand column. Then I begin to take stock of each of them. If you’d like to do a similar analysis for your genealogy tools and resources, feel free to use my spreadsheet as a model for your own evaluation.

Download the Genealogy Tools Evaluation Spreadsheet.

My evaluation criteria are simple and few. The following are the four I used for this year’s review:

  1. How often have I used the genealogy resource or tool in the past year?
  2. How successful have I been at finding useful genealogical information for my family tree from this genealogy resource or tool?
  3. How many times have I had an “AH-HA” moment of discovery using the genealogy resource or tool? And, of course,
  4. How much did I spend on this genealogy tool or resource?

I proceed to place a value of 0, 1, or 3 points for each of the first three evaluation criteria for each item in my list and the dollar amount in the fourth. Then just in case of a tie, I have a column on the far right-hand side that asks: Is this genealogy resource or tool fun to use? I really like to have fun with my family history, so I place a premium on those genealogy research tools and resources that offer me not only useful information, but some enjoyment as well. This column, since it is a tie-breaker, simply gets a “-” or a “+” sign.

When all was said and done, after this exercise my genealogy tools budget for 2013 was remarkably easy to assemble.

My review includes every subscription and membership that I purchased during the year for any genealogy or history society, museum, software program, database, or association. In my case (simply for example) I have such diverse line items as MyHeritage.com (the software I use for my family tree and our family social network website), the British Newspaper Archive, Ohio Genealogical Society, Ancestry.com, Ohio History Society, Cornwall Family History Society, Minnesota Historical Society, Association of Professional Genealogists, National Genealogical Society, Czechoslovak Genealogical Society International, National Czech and Slovak Museum and Library, Ontario, Canada Genealogical Society, and almost two dozen additional state and local societies—in addition to GenealogyBank. I include them all from my largest individual annual outlay of $299 for Ancestry to my smallest for a local genealogical society that still only charges $10 a year. (I do not enter the costs I incur each year for experts, long distance assistants, translators, and genealogy tourism/travel in this evaluation spreadsheet because I have a different analysis I use for these outlays.)

You might find it interesting to know that GenealogyBank.com was one of the very top-rated genealogy resources in my analysis.

screenshot of an Excel spreadsheet

The following are the answers from the table I constructed:

  1. I used GenealogyBank.com at least every week and some weeks every day: 3 points.
  2. Over and over, on almost every log-in, I discovered extremely useful, critical, and unique information for my family tree: 3 points.
  3. My “AH-HA” moments were numerous, ranging from articles that provided needed background, obituaries that listed previously missing family members (especially married names of daughters and nieces), and the intensely precious newspaper photos that in several cases make up the only family photo we have of a particular family member: 3 points.
  4. I pay for my GenealogyBank.com subscription on the annual plan, so I notice when I have to part with the fee of $55.95—but I actually do it with a smile because if I divide this total by month, day, article found, or “AH-HA” moment, it works out to pennies a discovery. Well worth it!

Oh, and one of my favorite parts is that GenealogyBank.com also gets a “+” in the “fun column.” I have had more fun finding my family history discoveries and learning new and exciting aspects of the times of my ancestors through GenealogyBank’s newspaper collections than I have had on any other genealogy-oriented site. In fact I always find myself looking forward to logging in, ready for another session.

So GenealogyBank came out of my analysis with a score of 9+, the highest possible score. Renewal for sure!

We all know that genealogy can be an expensive hobby, but in this case there is no second-guessing my use of GenealogyBank.com as one of my premier, must-have sites.

I hope you found my genealogy resource and tool review method helpful. Good luck with your own family history searching in 2013!

Italian American (Americano Italiano) Newspapers Are Coming!

GenealogyBank is pleased to announce that later this year it will be adding six Italian American newspapers from three states: California, New York and Pennsylvania.

These new additions to GenealogyBank’s online historical newspaper archives will provide thousands of articles to help you do genealogy research on your Italian American ancestors. Trace your Italian ancestry back to the 1800s with obituaries, birth notices, wedding announcements, and local news stories found in these old Italian-language newspapers.

photo of Mulberry Street in "Little Italy" in New York City around 1900

Photo: Mulberry Street, “Little Italy” in New York City, around 1900. Credit: Wikipedia.

The early Italian American newspapers we will be adding soon to our online archives include:

State

City Newspaper

Start

End

CA

San Francisco Corriere del Popolo

1916

1962

NY

New York Cristoforo Colombo

1891

1893

NY

New York Eco d’Italia

1890

1896

NY

New York Fiaccola Weekly

1912

1921

NY

New York Progresso Italo-Americano

1886

1950

PA

Philadelphia Momento

1917

1919

Look for these Italian news titles to be added online late in 2013.

GenealogyBank’s Archives Keep Growing, Every Single Day

In the next few weeks GenealogyBank will be adding even more newspapers to its vast online historical newspaper archives, which currently contain more than 6,400 titles and over 1.25 billion articles—including more than 215 million obituaries.

Here is a list of the newspaper titles and date ranges that will be added from seven states: Illinois, Massachusetts, Nebraska, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, and Virginia—plus the District of Columbia.

In the next few weeks GenealogyBank will be adding even more newspapers to its vast online historical newspaper archives, which currently contain more than 6,400 titles and over 1.25 billion articles—including more than 215 million obituaries.

Here is a list of the newspaper titles and date ranges that will be added from seven states: Illinois, Massachusetts, Nebraska, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, and Virginia—plus the District of Columbia.

State City Newspaper

Issues

Pages

Start

End

District of Columbia Washington (DC) Evening Star            812     22234

4/28/1908

3/20/1912

Illinois Springfield Daily Illinois State Register               81        1184

7/3/1896

7/25/1915

Massachusetts Boston Boston Daily Record            226        3956

6/6/1958

8/25/1961

Massachusetts Boston Boston Herald 4819 78844

9/21/1920

1/31/1969

Massachusetts Boston Boston Traveller 1029     41660

7/1/1948

10/31/1959

Nebraska Omaha Omaha World Herald                  1               52

9/17/1981

9/17/1981

North Carolina Greensboro Greensboro Daily News               30            620

7/1/1939

7/31/1939

North Carolina Greensboro Greensboro News and Record               38        3940

4/4/1984

2/23/1986

North Carolina Greensboro Greensboro Record               62        2295

3/1/1946

10/21/1983

Ohio Cincinnati Cincinnati Post               23            425

7/23/1915

12/20/1922

South Carolina Charleston Evening Post                  5               62

10/5/1912

7/16/1913

Virginia Richmond Richmond Times Dispatch               43        2433

10/27/1935

1/31/1954

 

 

New Year’s Genealogy Resolutions for Genealogists in 2013

It’s the start of a new year, a time when many people think about making some changes. Here are four suggestions I have; I hope that genealogists take to heart these New Year’s resolutions for 2013.

Use Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Search through historical newspaper archives for each of your ancestors and find those old stories that over time have been lost to the family.

Family stories like the one in this obituary, containing the riveting recollection of Hannah (Clark) Lyman (1734-1832), who recalled the earthquake of 1755 so vividly all her life that it was referenced in her obituary when she died—77 years after the earthquake struck!

Hannah Lyman's Obituary in the Hampshire Gazette March 21, 1832

Hampshire Gazette (Northampton, Massachusetts), 21 March 1832, page 3.

Resolve this year to find your family stories in old newspapers: document these stories, preserve them and pass them down.

Scan Your Family Photos and Documents

Every day we read about storms that destroy homes and wash away treasured family photos and papers. Don’t let that happen to you. Resolve this year to scan your family’s documentation and put it online. Secure it so that the information is there regardless of tomorrow’s storms or other disasters. Set up a reasonable schedule that you can stick to, such as putting up five documents/photos every week. Keep plugging away, and at the end of the year you’ll have over 250 items preserved for future generations online. Start now.

Put Your Family History Online

As a dedicated genealogist you’ve likely spent years researching your family—you don’t want all that hard work to be lost. Preserve your genealogy research by resolving to put it online. There are lots of terrific websites where you can post your family history. It’s a good idea to put your family history on multiple sites. I strongly recommend that you create a family tree on Ancestry.com and on FamilySearch.org; these are both good genealogy websites for hosting family trees.

Upload your family tree onto the genealogy sites you’ve chosen, setting the upload so that it excludes the current, living members of the family. Then add scans of your family photos and documents.

Make sure that as you add new genealogical data, you update the information on all your online family trees.

Resolve to do this today to preserve and pass down your family’s heritage.

Print Your Family History and Put a Copy of the Printed Document Online

To accomplish this, use Scribd.com, a handy, free online site for publishing and distributing your family history.

You probably have your family history on one of the many excellent family history software programs like: Legacy, RootsMagic or PAF.

Simply use the report function on these family tree software programs to print out your family history, being careful to not include the current, living members of the family.

By putting these reports online, every name becomes easily searchable via Google, Bing, etc. I have had many breakthroughs on my family tree by using Scribd.com.

Resolve to use Scribd.com to preserve and pass down your family’s history—that’s a New Year’s resolution you won’t regret.

edward and mary rutledge genealogy records on Scribd.com

Edward & Mary Rutledge’s Genealogy Records on Scribd.com

Genealogy Records You Can Find In Newspaper Archives Infographic

Genealogy Records in Newspaper Archives

Is the Infographic image above too small? See the larger version.

Newspapers offer a variety of genealogy records that you can use to trace back your family tree. Learn about the types of genealogy records that can be found in newspapers and discover the family history information that each record type contains below.

Obituaries

Obituaries are an excellent source of genealogical information. Obits contain your deceased ancestor’s date of death and burial place, and often provide details about their spouse, children, parents as well as other extended family.

Passenger Lists

From passenger ships arriving at naturalization ports to stage coaches traveling across the frontier, several types of passenger lists are printed in newspapers. These lists contain the names of our traveling ancestors.

Birth Records

Birth records in newspapers include birth announcements and birth notices. These records contain the name of the newborn, time, date and place of birth as well as information about the infant’s parents, siblings and grandparents.

Legal Records

Many types of legal records are made public in newspapers. Probate records, court case records and name change records contain valuable genealogical information such as ancestors’ names, relatives, places of residence and more.

Photographs

Newspapers record many of life’s special moments. As such, you can find pictures of your ancestors in wedding photos, family reunion photos, birthday photos and old photo illustrations and sketches often printed in newspapers.

Marriage Records

Engagement announcements and marriage records are commonly printed in newspapers. These records give the name of the bride and groom, and provide details about the wedding including family members and friends in attendance.

New & Improved Newspaper Search!

With GenealogyBank’s new newspaper search functionality you can easily search each of the genealogy record types covered here to discover more about your family history.

Search now at: http://www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/

Click the options in the left navigation to search by record types.

Ancestry Believe It or Not: Genealogy Scams, Fakes & Forgers

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this guest blog post, Mary writes about genealogical fakes and frauds, and cautions readers to be careful in documenting their family history.

You can’t always believe what you read—or can you?

Genealogy, when done right, is a pursuit requiring patience, with family relationships being carefully established and well documented. But be wary when constructing your family tree; examine each piece of evidence with a critical eye.

Exaggerations abound in genealogy, many of which can be categorized under the “Believe It or Not” phrase made famous by Robert. L. Ripley (1890-1949).

In order to “prove” more impressive ancestry than they actually have, scoundrels and frauds sometimes doctor documents, create fictitious Bible records, and even sell services to unsuspecting family researchers.

Some of the more notorious genealogy fakes and forgers were Gustave Anjou, Harriet de Salis and Horatio Gates Somerby.

Gustave Anjou (1863-1942), a.k.a. Swedish native Gustaf Ludvig Jungberg

Anjou immigrated to America from Sweden, after being released from incarceration in 1886, reportedly on a forgery charge. He became active in genealogical societies in the New Jersey and New York areas, and proceeded to sell his services as a researcher to wealthy citizens. His specialty was fabricating descent from royal lineages.

Some of his more infamous works included supposed lineages for the families of Andrews, Dent, Duff, Grant, Houston, Hurd, Longyear, Shapleigh, Wyckoff, and many more genealogical frauds. He also published a reference on the Ulster Country, New York, Probate Records. For a more thorough list of his junk genealogies, conduct a search in WorldCat or Google Books.

Gustave Anjou’s passport photo (1924)

Gustave Anjou’s passport photo (1924)

Even Anjou’s name is a sham or half-truth. His passport application of 1924 reported his father as “Charles Gustave Marie Anjou” and that he was born in Paris, France. This fabrication was derived from his parents’ names, Carl Gustaf Jungberg and housekeeper, Maria Lovia Hapberg, along with the Anjou reference from his fiancée (later wife), Anna Maria Anjou. The passport application noted he was naturalized in 1918 and that he was following the occupation of genealogist.

Gustave Anjou’s passport application (1924)

Gustave Anjou’s passport application (1924)

References to Anjou’s association with genealogy can be found in New York City records:

  • The New York City Directory of 1910 reported: “British-Am Record Soc, 116 Nassau R [Residence] 1116—C. Percy Hurditch, Pres; Gustave Anjou, Sec.”
  • The New York City Directory of 1912 reported: “Am Genealogical Soc., 116 Nassau R 1117—Gustave Anjou, Sec.”

In the following historical newspaper article, we can see the ripple effect of Anjou’s fraudulent genealogy work. A New Orleans newspaper’s Genealogical Department ran a feature called “Who’s Who and Their Forbears,” and innocently quoted Anjou’s work assuming it was authentic.

Who’s Who and Their Forbears, Times-Picayune newspaper article 11 August 1912

Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana), 11 August 1912, page 34

Mrs. Harriet de Salis, nee Bainbridge

De Salis was a noted cookbook author. The title of one of her publications, Tempting Dishes for Small Incomes published in 1903, seems to hold a “secret message” about her second career: junk genealogy. Her culinary skills apparently didn’t generate enough income, so she turned to providing a fraudulent genealogy service, much like Anjou.

Some of her noted counterfeits were submitted by her eager clients to the New England Historical and Genealogical Register (NEHGR) . Unfortunately for de Salis, NEHGR researchers typically investigate exuberant ancestral claims, as seen in this 1943 response pointedly remarking on de Salis’s “vivid imagination”:

“The wills of ‘Edward’ and ‘Valentine’ [Woodman] appear to have been the offspring of Harriet de Salis’ vivid imagination—at least no such wills can now be found. After this auspicious beginning she proceeded to construct a wondrous pedigree making Nicholas the ancestor of the two New England progenitors and deducing his descent from all the ancient and gentle family of Woodman of Surrey.”

The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. 97, p. 282 (1943).

Little mention of de Salis appears in GenealogyBank. Her death date and obituary were not located in its vast historical newspaper archives. Interestingly, however, there is a mention of de Salis in GenealogyBank’s United States Congressional Serial Set archives, referring to her 1888 oyster cookbook.

mention of Harriet De Salis's 1888 oyster cookbook in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set

United States Commission of Fish and Fisheries, Part XVIII. Report of the Commissioner for the year ending June 30, 1892. Date: Monday, January 1, 1894. Publication: Serial Set Vol. No.3264; Report: H.Misc.Doc. 209.

Horatio Gates “H. G.” Somerby (1805-1872)

Somerby, a native of Newburyport, Massachusetts, moved to England, where he fabricated genealogies for Americans wishing to establish English origins.

WorldCat and Google Books report a variety of publications on families that feature suspect genealogical work done by Somerby, such as The Blakes of Somerset, John Cotton of Boston, The Searstan Family of Colchester, Pedigree of Lawrence, A Sketch of the Family of Dumaresq, and Notices of the Sears Family.

GenealogyBank’s newspapers report that a man by the name of “Horatio B. Somerby” was a witness at a forgery trial. Although the middle initial is incorrect, it may be a typo. One has to wonder about the association with a noted forger, especially one with New England connections, and suspect this is really Horatio G. Somerby.

forgery trial report, Boston Herald newspaper article 13 October 1848

Boston Herald (Boston, Massachusetts), 13 October 1848, page 2

GenealogyBank has a brief notice of his death in London, but this death notice makes no mention of his background in fraudulent genealogy.

Horatio Somerby death notice, Salem Register newspaper article 5 December 1872

Salem Register (Salem, Massachusetts), 5 December 1872, page 2

There are numerous examples of scammers, frauds, fakes and forgers in genealogical research, so remember the famous words of Ripley: “Believe It or Not,” and be careful documenting your family history to keep it real!

50 Tennessee Newspapers Online for Your Genealogy Research

GenealogyBank has put more than 50 Tennessee newspapers online making it even easier for genealogists to find their old family stories and detailed information for their family tree.

Search millions of Tennessee newspaper articles in our online TN newspaper archives, including birth announcements, marriage notices, obituaries, and local news stories, to find out more about your ancestors from “The Volunteer State.”

collage of the Tennessee state seal and the Tennessee Herald masthead

Collage of the Tennessee state seal and the Tennessee Herald masthead

Click and start researching your ancestry now (each title is a link that will take you directly to that newspaper’s search page):

City Newspaper Date Range Collection
Athens Daily Post-Athenian 1/11/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Carthage Carthage Gazette 8/13/1808 – 7/1/1817 Newspaper Archives
Carthage Western Express 11/21/1808 – 11/21/1808 Newspaper Archives
Chattanooga Chattanooga Courier 2/10/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chattanooga Chattanooga Daily Rebel 8/9/1862 – 4/27/1865 Newspaper Archives
Chattanooga Chattanooga Times Free Press 4/1/1995 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chattanooga Justice 12/24/1887 – 12/24/1887 Newspaper Archives
Clarksville Clarksville Gazette 11/21/1819 – 12/23/1820 Newspaper Archives
Clarksville Tennessee Weekly Chronicle 1/27/1819 – 6/7/1819 Newspaper Archives
Clarksville Town Gazette 7/5/1819 – 11/8/1819 Newspaper Archives
Clarksville Weekly Chronicle 2/18/1818 – 9/16/1818 Newspaper Archives
Cleveland Cleveland Daily Banner 10/2/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Columbia Daily Herald 1/8/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cookeville Herald-Citizen 4/12/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
Crossville Crossville Chronicle 9/1/1996 – Current Recent Obituaries
Crossville Glade Sun 6/2/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Dayton Herald-News 1/6/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greeneville Greeneville Sun 9/14/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jackson Jackson Headlight 1/27/1900 – 1/27/1900 Newspaper Archives
Kingston Roane County News 1/14/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Knoxville Daily Journal and Journal and Tribune 4/1/1888 – 12/31/1896 Newspaper Archives
Knoxville Knoxville Enlightener 1/31/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Knoxville Knoxville Gazette 12/7/1793 – 10/29/1806 Newspaper Archives
Knoxville Knoxville News Sentinel 1/4/1991 – Current Recent Obituaries
Knoxville Negro World 10/15/1887 – 11/26/1887 Newspaper Archives
Knoxville Wilson’s Knoxville Gazette 9/1/1818 – 9/1/1818 Newspaper Archives
Lafayette Macon County Times 10/2/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
LaFollette LaFollette Press 11/21/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lenoir City News-Herald 9/27/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Maryville Blount Today 2/1/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Maryville Daily Times 1/1/1997 – Current Recent Obituaries
Memphis Commercial Appeal 1/1/1968 – 12/31/1969 Newspaper Archives
Memphis Commercial Appeal 6/27/1990 – Current Recent Obituaries
Memphis Memphis Daily Avalanche 1/1/1866 – 4/30/1869 Newspaper Archives
Memphis Memphis Triangle 11/17/1928 – 7/27/1929 Newspaper Archives
Memphis Tri-State Defender 2/3/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Murfreesboro Murfreesboro Union 6/6/1939 – 6/6/1939 Newspaper Archives
Nashville Colored Tennessean 8/12/1865 – 7/18/1866 Newspaper Archives
Nashville Impartial Review 1/18/1806 – 8/16/1806 Newspaper Archives
Nashville Nashville Gazette 5/26/1819 – 2/14/1827 Newspaper Archives
Nashville Nashville Post 1/21/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Nashville Nashville Scene 11/23/1995 – Current Recent Obituaries
Nashville National Banner and Nashville Whig 1/1/1834 – 12/30/1836 Newspaper Archives
Nashville Review 11/10/1809 – 5/3/1811 Newspaper Archives
Nashville Tennessee Gazette 2/25/1800 – 5/30/1807 Newspaper Archives
Newport Newport Plain Talk 7/1/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
Oak Ridge Oak Ridger 2/17/1997 – Current Recent Obituaries
Paris Paris Post-Intelligencer 7/5/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Rogersville Rogersville Review 12/16/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
Rogersville Western Pilot 8/19/1815 – 8/19/1815 Newspaper Archives
Sevierville Mountain Press 10/2/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Shelbyville Tennessee Herald 12/19/1817 – 3/8/1820 Newspaper Archives
Sweetwater Advocate and Democrat 6/12/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tazewell Claiborne Progress 10/2/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wartburg Morgan County News 12/19/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries

‘Mayflower’ Genealogy Research Tip: Cast a Wide Net for Your Ancestor

With Thanksgiving just six days away, I thought I would search for any articles in GenealogyBank’s archives that mentioned Dr. Samuel Fuller—who was one of my Mayflower ancestors.

I searched putting the terms “Mayflower Samuel Fuller” in the “Include Keywords” search box. Bang—GenealogyBank returned over 1,800 records.

That’s great; I can spend a long Thanksgiving weekend documenting more ancestors in our family tree.

GenealogyBank search results for the terms “Mayflower Samuel Fuller”

GenealogyBank search results for the terms “Mayflower Samuel Fuller”

Looking at the search results in GenealogyBank’s online newspaper archives, I can quickly see that the articles are exactly what I was hoping to find so that I can dig deeper into my Mayflower roots.

GenealogyBank newspaper search results for the terms “Mayflower Samuel Fuller”

GenealogyBank newspaper search results for the terms “Mayflower Samuel Fuller”

Looking at some of the article snippet views I see an obituary notice of Mrs. Harriet M. Clapp, a Fuller descendant; an article about the Mayflower signers; an article from a genealogy column that appeared in the Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio); and an article about the cradle used by Dr. Samuel Fuller’s children.

These are clearly some solid articles I can use for my Mayflower genealogy research. I will want to take the time to sift through and study each one, noting and following each clue to trace my Mayflower ancestry.

Looking at my initial overview of the Mayflower search results, they also include 48 obituaries from our Recent Obituaries collection. After clicking on those results, I see that these 48 hits are also going to be useful in helping me learn more about my Mayflower ancestors.

GenealogyBank recent obituary search results for the terms “Mayflower Samuel Fuller”

GenealogyBank recent obituary search results for the terms “Mayflower Samuel Fuller”

It is common for individuals to be enthusiastic about their family history—so much so that they often refer to it even in their obituary.

Great. This gives me even more articles to read through and add more relatives to my family tree.

I expect that researching my Mayflower lines using this wide approach will net me over 1,000 very useful and targeted articles, letting me add hundreds of new relatives to my family tree.

It’s going to be a busy Thanksgiving!

From old passenger lists to recent obituaries, you can find records to discover more about your early American roots in GenealogyBank’s online archives.