More Florida Resources Go Online – State Census & Newspapers

FamilySearchLabs has put the 1885, 1935 and 1945 Florida State census records online.

These state census records are not indexed – but can be easily searched online geographically.

The process is simple. Click on the year you want to search; then select the county where your ancestor’s lived. Then click through each page of the census as if you were looking at a roll of microfilm.

Click here to search the 1885 Florida State Census

Click here to search the 1935 Florida State Census

Click here to search the 1945 Florida State Census

GenealogyBank has also announced that it is adding:
Pensacola Gazette and West Florida Advertiser. Pensacola, FL. 1824 to 1856

GenealogyBank already has the following Florida newspapers online:
Banner. (Bonita Springs, FL). 1/27/1996-Current
Biscayne Boulevard Times (Miami, FL). 8/1/2005-Current
Boca Raton News (FL). 3/2/2006-Current
Bonita Daily News (FL). 5/23/2006-Current
Bradenton Herald (FL). 1/19/1991-Current
Charlotte Sun (Port Charlotte, FL). 8/3/1996-Current
Collier Citizen (FL). 7/6/2007-Current
Daily Commercial (Leesburg, FL). 12/1/2000-Current
Daytona Beach News-Journal (FL). 3/27/1996-Current
DeLand-Deltona Beacon (FL). 11/17/2000-Current
DeSoto Sun (Arcadia, FL). 4/14/1996-Current
Diario de Tampa (Ybor City, FL). 6/6/1908 – 7/14/1911
East County Observer (Sarasota, FL). 8/17/2006-Current
Ecos (Tampa, FL). 7/21/1959 – 7/21/1959
El Nuevo Herald (Miami, FL). 1/1/1983-Current
Englewood Sun (FL). 3/5/1996-Current
Florida Herald and Southern Democrat (St. Augustine, FL). 1/4/1823 – 9/13/1828
Variant titles: East Florida Herald
Florida Keys Keynoter (Marathon, FL). 11/6/2002-Current
Florida Times-Union (Jacksonville, FL). 1/12/1996-Current
Florida Today (Melbourne, FL). 1/1/1999-Current
Floridian & Advocate (Tallahassee, FL). 10/24/1831 – 4/2/1842
Floridian and Journal (Tallahassee, FL). 1/6/1849 – 12/22/1860
Variant titles: Floridian; Floridian and Advocate; Weekly Floridian
Fort Pierce News (FL). 5/2/1997-6/16/2000
Fort Pierce Tribune (FL). 8/13/2002-Current
Jupiter Courier (FL). 9/3/2000-Current
Key West Citizen (FL). 10/31/1999-Current
Longboat Observer (Longboat Key, FL). 11/2/2006-Current
Manatee River Journal (Manatee, FL). 9/5/1889 – 12/31/1922
Variant titles: Manatee River Journal and Bradenton Herald; Manatee River Journal-Herald
Marco Island Eagle
(FL). 6/7/2006-Current
Miami Herald Record (Miami, FL). 1/1/1911 – 12/31/1922
Miami Herald (FL). 1/1/1983-Current
Naples Daily News (FL). 1/3/1998-Current
News-Press (Fort Myers, FL). 5/2/1999-Current
News-Sun (Sebring, FL). 4/14/2005-Current
North Port Sun (FL). 5/3/1996-Current
Ocala Star-Banner (FL). 1/1/1991-Current
Orlando Sentinel (FL). 4/1/1985-Current
Orlando Weekly (FL). 1/5/2006-Current
Palm Beach Daily News (FL). 1/2/2000-Current
Palm Beach Post (FL). 1/1/1989-Current
Pensacola News Journal (FL). 1/1/1999-Current
Reporter (Tavernier, FL). 2/27/2004-Current
Sarasota Herald-Tribune (FL). 1/1/1996-Current
Sebastian Sun (FL). 3/19/1999-Current
South Florida Sun-Sentinel (Ft. Lauderdale, FL). 1/1/1986-Current
South Lake Press (Clermont, FL). 7/13/2005-Current
St. Augustine Record (FL). 9/25/2006-Current
St. Petersburg Times (FL). 1/1/1987-Current
Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News (FL). 9/2/2000-Current
Tallahassee Democrat (FL). 1/1/1994-Current
Tampa Tribune (FL). 8/13/1990-Current
Venice Gondolier Sun (FL). 7/1/1996-Current
Vero Beach Press Journal (FL). 12/2/1997-Current

.

Thank you GenealogyBank!

We get letters all the time from ecstatic genealogists who broke through their brick walls in GenealogyBank. Grateful letters that say – “Wow – I finally found him” in GenealogyBank … thank you, thank you.

Tonight I received a “Wow – I finally found him” note from Jane Giavelli Lauhon. She wrote:

Thank you so much for your hard work and dedication by maintaining your website.


Since 1980 (when I began my genealogy search) I have been trying to find a connection to Italy for my Dad’s Giavelli side.
Our Giavelli ancestor’s have been a huge, huge challenge because they were affiliated with The Ravel’s (a circus group from France). I have been researching Ravel’s hoping to find information about my 2nd great grandfather, Leon Giavelli and his wife, Harriet Wells.

Today I was finally able to find the connection and am very, very happy.

I knew this family originated in Italy; I just didn’t know it until today when one of your articles connected us to Giavelli’s in Italy.

My mother’s father, Guissepe Manno, is Italian and I have been wondering how much Italian ancestry I have. Now I can say I am 1/2 Italian!

Thank you again and I am going to keep searching your site to see what other goldmine’s I can find.

Sincerely,
Jane Giavelli Lauhon

This is what Jane found – what will you find?
Give GenealogyBank a try right now click here and sign up.

Allen County Library (IN) receives $10 Million Gift

The Genealogy Center of the Allen County Library (Ft. Wyane, IN) has received a $10 million gift from the Edward D. and Ione Auer Foundation. The funds will be given to the library as $1 million payments each year over 10 years. The announcement is in the Ft Wayne News Sentinnel 1 August 2008

This landmark library has been active in genealogy for decades.

The Center will host a Military Records Symposium
Friday & Saturday, September 26 & 27, 2008

Speaker: Marie Varrelman Melchiori, CG, CGL

Friday, September 26, 20083:00 PM “Using Records at the National Archives: A Researcher’s View”
This session will cover National Archive records, some that have been microfilmed or digitized, from a researcher’s point of view. The session will explain how and why the records are arranged the way they are. Ms. Melchiori will also discuss “archijive,” the short-cut phrases used by archivists that genealogists need to know in order to understand what they are being told.

6:30 PM Dinner, speaker Curt Witcher, Genealogy Center Manger, “Our Military Heritage Website: Record, Recall, & Revere”

Saturday, September 27, 2008
9:30 AM “If Grandpa Wore Blue: Union Records in the National Archives”This session will be a look at commonly used records as well as some of the lesserused records for researching an ancestor who was a Union soldier. Some of the records covered will include correspondence, carded medical files, and the investigative records of Baker and Turner.

11:00 AM “If Grandpa Wore Gray: Confederate Records in the National Archives”
This session will be a look at Confederate records, both microfilmed and original, at the National Archives. Records created by the Union Army may help locate information on your Southern soldier as well as male and female civilians.

1 – 6 PM: Individual consultationsGenealogy Center staff and other researchers will be available to assist one with specific research challenges, and recommend sources and methodologies to find more records and data.

Click here to register for this important conference.

Wild Bill Obama

May 27th was Wild Bill Hickok’s day – I wrote about how easy it is to find newspaper articles about him in GenealogyBank.

Wild Bill Hickok is in the news again – when Barack Obama mentioned his family tradition that he was a distant cousin to Wild Bill – James Butler Hickok (1837-1876).

(Photo: Texas Observer Blog 27 Feb 2007)

Don’t you love it when politicians talk about their genealogy!

The New England Historic Genealogical Society does and issued a statement yesterday verifying Obama’s family tradition:

Obama and Hickok are sixth cousins, six-times removed. Their common ancestor is Thomas Blossom, who came to Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1629 from Leiden, Holland. Obama’s 4th great-grandfather, Jacob Dunham, was 6th cousins with Wild Bill. Obama’s mother, Stanley Ann, is also a Dunham.

“The ancestry of Wild Bill Hickok was published by NEHGS some years back, which showed he descended from the Blossom family of Cape Cod, an early family written up in one of our scholarly publications,” said Child. He added, “Since we had also recently done the ancestry of Senator Obama, finding this connection was a little easier.”

Click here to see the Obama – Hickok family tree – Wild Bill is related to Obama through his mother Polly Butler.

Philadelphia Marriage Index 1885-1951 Online

Last month we told you about the Philadelphia Death Certificates 1803-1915 going online.

This week FamilySearchLabs.org has put up more data. The indexes to Philadelphia Marriages 1885-1951 are now online. Click Here to search them.

Genealogists can page through this index to find the date and marriage license certificate number for their ancestor’s marriage.

The index is divided into five sections: 1885-1916; 1917-1938; 1939-1942; 1943-1946; and 1947-1951.

Simply select the time period you want to search and browse the index to locate your ancestor.

The Philadelphia Inquirer 1860-1922 along with over 280 Philadelphia and Pennsylvania newspapers from the colonial period right up to today are already online at GenealogyBank

It’s a great day for genealogy!

New York City – APG Chapter takes detailed tour of GenealogyBank – Part 2

As promised – here is the PowerPoint presentation used at the NY Metro Chapter meeting last night.

Simply click your way through the presentation.
The presentation is focused on the variety and value of resources that you can find in GenealogyBank. With over 230 million documents & articles – it is a unique resource for genealogists.

Remember-
All of
GenealogyBank may be searched for free.

In the free search you will see a preview snippet of the article showing the name of your ancestor that you are searching for. These snippets let you confirm which articles and records GenealogyBank has on your ancestors before you join.

Your membership helps us to make even more records available.

Your membership in GenealogyBank entitles you to read the complete text of over 230 million articles and records – search for more than 1 billion of your relatives.

Sign up now and ask your friends to join with us in bringing more records online – It’s only $9.95 – click here.

GenealogyBank adds even more newspapers


Hot off the press!

I just received word that GenealogyBank began adding an additional 67 historical newspapers today.

(Image from Library of Congress – American Memory Project)

That jumps the total with yesterday’s announcement to 107 titles added this weekend!!

These titles will finish loading later this week.

These additional historical newspapers are from Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, New Mexico and Texas and cover the dates 1855 to 1977.

That’s just too many titles for me to list here – but I will put the complete list on GenealogyBank Monday morning. Click here to see the 40 titles I announced yesterday.

It’s a great day for Genealogy ….

…and a great day for GenealogyBank too.
All of GenealogyBank may be searched for free.

In the free search you will see a preview snippet of the article showing the name of your ancestor that you are searching for.

These snippets let you confirm which articles and records GenealogyBank has on your ancestors before you join. Your membership helps us to make even more records available.

Your membership in GenealogyBank entitles you to read the complete text of over 230 million articles and records – search for more than 1 billion of your relatives.

Sign up now and ask your friends to join with us in bringing more records online – It’s only $9.95 – click here.

www.GenealogyBank.com adding more historical newspapers – Alabama, Colorado, Georgia, Oregon, Pennsylvania – over 20 States


GenealogyBank is adding even more newspapers – 40 titles from 20 States!

Millions of articles are going live on the site beginning today through next week.

Here is a list of just some of the content that has been added.

All of GenealogyBank may be searched for free.

In the free search you will see a preview snippet of the article showing the name of your ancestor that you are searching for. These snippets let you confirm which articles and records GenealogyBank has on your ancestors before you join.

Your membership helps us to make even more records available.

Your membership in GenealogyBank entitles you to read the complete text of over 230 million articles and records – search for more than 1 billion of your relatives.

Sign up now and ask your friends to join with us in bringing more records online – It’s only $9.95 – click here.

This list includes the newspapers that we are adding to GenealogyBank beginning today.

Next week I will post the names of even more newspapers that we are adding.

It is a great day for genealogy!

Alabama
Montgomery. Montgomery Advertiser. 7/1/1916 to 8/31/1916

Arizona
Tucson. Tucson Daily Citizen. 5/1/1909 to 8/31/1909

California
Santa Cruz. Santa Cruz Sentinel. 2/9/2008 to Current
Santa Monica. Santa Monica Daily Press. 3/29/2005 to Current

Colorado
Colorado Springs. Gazette-Telegraph. 1/4/1873 to 10/31/1913
Denver. Denver Republican. 4/20/1906 to 4/20/1906

Connecticut
Bridgeport. Connecticut Courier. 3/8/1814 to 6/14/1826
Hartford. Religious Inquirer. 11/10/1821 to 11/07/1835
New Haven. Daily Herald. 6/4/1836 to 12/26/1836
New London. Republican Advocate. 1/2/1822 to 12/10/1828
Norwich. Canal of Intelligence. 8/22/1827 to 10/28/1829
Norwich. Norwich Aurora. 5/15/1839 to 3/10/1876
Torrington. Register Citizen. 10/25/2007 to Current

Washington, DC. Metropolitan. 8/20/1825-12/18/1835

Georgia
Conyers. Rockdale Citizen. 11/24/2007 to Current
Cumming. Forsyth County News. 2/16/2006 to Current

Hawaii
Honolulu. Pacific Commercial Advertiser. 6/2/1859 to 6/28/1873

Idaho
Coeur d’Alene. Coeur d’Alene Press. 10/1/2003 to Current

Illinois
Chicago. Chicago Times. 11/2/1854 to 7/3/1888
Nauvoo. Nauvoo Expositor. 6/7/1844 to 6/7/1844

Kansas
Shawnee. Siwinowe Kesibwi. 1/11/1811 to 1/11/1811

Louisiana
New Orleans. Jeffersonian. 5/30/1842 to 5/30/1842

Massachusetts
Boston. Boston Evening Transcript. 7/2/1855 to 12/31/1855
Boston. Daily Atlas. 1/1/1848 to 6/30/1848
Boston. Saturday Evening Gazette. 9/20/1856 to 3/26/1859
Springfield. Springfield Republican. 1/1/1877 to 2/29/1908

Missouri
Kansas City. Unfettered Letters. 9/29/2005 to Current

Montana
Anaconda. Anaconda Standard. 7/1/1920 to 8/31/1920

New York
New York City. Irish World. 1/11/1890 to 5/30/1903
New York City. New York Evangelist. 6/16/1870 to 7/26/1877
New York City. New York Ledger. 1/3/1863 to 12/26/1863
New York City. Spectator. 5/13/1831 to 4/30/1834
Syracuse. Northern Christian Advocate. 7/4/1900 to 5/28/1908

Oregon
Portland. Oregonian. 4/17/1921 to 12/9/1922

Pennsylvania
Philadelphia. Philadelphia Inquirer. 6/2/1834 to 10/31/1860

Vermont
St. Albans. St. Albans Daily Messenger. 7/2/1888 to 12/30/1922

Wisconsin
Milwaukee. Milwaukee Journal of Commerce. 3/15/1871 to 12/22/1880
Milwaukee. Wisconsin Free Democrat. 9/9/1845 to 12/26/1855
Monroe. Jeffersonian Democrat. 8/14/1856 to 3/26/1857

Homestead Act – May 20, 1862 – Daniel Freeman 1st Homesteader

Abraham Lincoln signed the Homestead Act on May 20, 1862. It would take effect on January 1, 1863. The first homesteader to take “the required oath and [be] given the documents which made him possessor of 160 acres of land” was Daniel Freeman (1826-1908).

Daniel Freeman was born April 26, 1826 in Lewisburg, Preble County, Ohio. The son of Samuel and Phebe (Willis) Freeman.

This image of Daniel Freeman is from the Omaha (NE) Sunday World Herald 26 June 1899.

According to that newspaper he and his family moved from Ohio to Illinois when he was 9 years old. In time he enlisted in “Company H of the Seventeenth Illinois Volunteers” and was stationed in Nebraska.

Freeman “had been ordered to return to St. Louis” and would not be in town when the land record office would open on January 2nd but the Recorder of Deeds James Bedford agreed to accommodate Freeman’s situation and made an exception and administered the oath at midnight the morning of January 1st so that he could leave to report in St. Louis.

Freeman wouldn’t return to build on his land until 1865. He literally married the “girl next door” – Agnes Suiter (1843-1931) – and they built their lives together there in Brownsville, Nebraska.

The Kansas City (MO) Times 26 May 1920 carried an image of the old homestead.

What a great day for genealogists. GenealogyBank is packed with newspaper articles and historical documents – over 227 Million of them that document and give the details of our ancestor’s lives.

It’s great to have the details and the actual images of our ancestors and their homes. Who knew it would be this easy to find them after all these years.

Give it a try for 30 days for $9.95.

Newspapers are terrific!

Newspapers are terrific! They give us the real details of our ancestor’s lives.

This week I found an article about the estate sale for my first cousin, Thomas Huse (1742/43-1816).

It was published in the Newburyport (MA) Herald, 16 July 1816.

Everything was being sold – his household effects; a covered sleigh; ox cart, an ox wagon; an eight day clock, a share certificate in the Merrimack Bridge, a grindstone and various tools.

It would be great to have these items as family heirlooms.

Was that “eight day clock” a Grandfather clock? Apparently most “eight day clocks” in that day were Grandfather or banjo clocks.

My Grandfather Huse made a banjo clock that still hangs in my uncle’s home in New Hampshire. Who knows, maybe Thomas Huse made the clock that was sold in his estate sale.

Thomas Huse owned a share of the Merrimack Bridge – that was one of the first suspension bridges built in America. The original was built in 1792 and it was replaced in 1810 with a wrought iron suspension bridge designed by Judge James Finley.

Thomas didn’t live long enough to see it, but eleven years after his death, February 6, 1827, the bridge collapsed under the weight of six oxen and two horses that were pulling a cart “loaded with wood” across the bridge.
The animals, wood and the two drivers all went into the water. Only the two drivers and horses survived. Who knew that oxen were so heavily used in early Newburyport.
See: Essex (MA) Register 8 Feb 1827. There are also articles describing the collapse of the bridge and the bridge that was built to replace it.

I think of my family and ancestors as “regular” people and I don’t expect to find them mentioned in newspapers but now that I’ve found hundreds of articles about them, I see how “local” papers used to be.

These old newspapers show us clearly who they were and how they lived their lives. You just can’t find this level of detail in any other source – newspapers are a terrific tool for genealogists.

GenealogyBank has over 2,400 historical newspapers from the 1600s to today. Give GenealogyBank a try (click here) right now.

Be sure to take advantage of GenealogyBank’s special price: only $69.95 for an annual subscription – but hurry, this special ends soon.
It’s a great day for genealogy!