Obituaries – From Annual Reports – Congress has chartered many national associations – among them the American Instructors of the Deaf.

Search Baltimore Sun Online

Search the back issues of the Baltimore Sun – click here.

Go through every page – millions of articles – obituaries, birth announcements and wedding notices. GenealogyBank has Maryland covered.

Click on these links to search the back issues of other Baltimore newspapers:

Click here to search newspapers published in other Maryland towns:

Tip: You can bookmark these links and quickly start your search in the back files of any Maryland newspaper.
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GenealogyBank adds and expands 25 newspapers in 17 states.

GenealogyBank adds and expands 25 newspapers in 17 states.

AK. Juneau.
Daily Record-Miner
1 issue. 10/8/1903

CO. Colorado Springs
Gazette-Telegraph. 12 issues. 5/24/1903 to 3/11/1920

CT. Middletown
Constitution. 37 issues. 1878-01-01 to 1878-12-03

CT. New London
New London Gazette. 146 issues. 1828-01-07 to 1835-12-30

KY. Louisville
Western Courier*. 148issues 1813-11-16 to 1816-09-26

LA. New Orleans
Times Picayune. 246 issues. 1861-05-15 to 1894-09-04

MD. Baltimore
Baltimore American. 12 issues. 6/27/1905 to 8/12/1911
MD. Baltimore
Federal Republican. 232 issues. 1811-03-19 to 1812-06-18

NC. Henderson
Daily Dispatch. 4/10/2002 to Present

NE. Nebraska City
Daily Nebraska Press. 2 issues. 1875-04-12 to 1875-08-23

NJ. Cranford
Chranford Chronicle. 6/9/2005 to Present

NJ. Somerville

Chronicle. 6/11/2005 to 3/3/2007
NJ. Somerville
Reporter. 6/9/2005 to Present

NJ. Summit
Independent Press. 8/2/2006 to Present
NJ. Trenton
Trenton State Gazette. 303 issues. 1849-01-01 to 1849-12-31

NY. New York
New York Herald. 206 issues. 1874-04-25 to 1883-12-17

OH. Cincinnati
Cincinnati Volksfreund*. 813 issues. 1863-02-18 to 12/28/1904

OH. Cleveland
Plain-Dealer. 307 issues. 1/15/1914 to 9/27/1922

OR. Portland
Oregonian. 1920 issues. 1867-04-22 to 3/10/1907

PA. Philadelphia
Aurora General Advertiser. 12 issues. 1797-03-01 to 1797-10-18

RI. Pawtucket
Pawtucket Times. 1 issue. 3/18/1920

SC. Charleston
City Gazette. 512 issues. 1823-01-01 to 1825-12-31

SD. Pierre
Capital Journal. 12/11/2007 to Present

UT. Salt Lake City
Salt Lake Telegram. 1 issue. 3/28/1919
UT. Salt Lake City
Salt Lake Tribune. 1 issue. 1893-03-02

Discover your heritage, preserve it and pass it on!

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Find and document your ancestors in GenealogyBank

The best source for old newspapers & documents on the planet.

Period!

African American Funeral Program Collection Online

Hat’s off to the: East Central Georgia Regional Library. They have put their African American Funeral Program Collection online.

This impressive collection has more than 1,000 funeral programs from the greater Augusta, Georgia area. They date from 1933 to 2008, with the bulk of the collection starting from 1960 to 2008.

According to the website:

The programs typically contain a photograph of the deceased, an obituary, a list of surviving relatives, and the order of service. The collection provides extensive genealogical information about the deceased, including birth and death dates, maiden names, names of relatives, past residences, and place of burial. Alongside this genealogical information, the obituaries provide a rich source of local history about African Americans. Many of the people included in this collection were prominent in their communities, and many were involved locally in the struggle for civil rights.

The African American Funeral Programs from the East Central Georgia Regional Library is a project of the Digital Library of Georgia in association with the East Central Georgia Regional Library as part of Georgia HomePLACE. The project is supported with federal LSTA funds administered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Georgia Public Library Service, a unit of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia.
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Revolutionary War Graves List

Get the most out of GenealogyBank!

The annual reports of the DAR – Daughters of the American Revolution are in GenealogyBank. They were published annually as part of the US Serial Set.
I didn’t know that was in GenealogyBank!

One of the important contributions that the DAR has made over the past 119 years is their effort to locate and document the grave of every soldier that served in the American Revolution.

Each year the DAR published the details of the soldier’s graves that they had located the previous year.

It’s a terrific resource for genealogists.

Discover your heritage, preserve it and pass it on!

Be a part of GenealogyBankSign up Now.

Find and document your ancestors in GenealogyBank – the best source for old newspapers & documents on the planet.

Period!

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GenealogyBank adds Dutchess Observer (Poughkeepsie, NY) Newspaper

GenealogyBank has added the Dutchess Observer – 1816-1821 – an historical newspaper published in Poughkeepsie, NY.

This early American newspaper includes local news, obituaries and birth announcements.


Find and document your ancestors in GenealogyBank – the best source for old newspapers on the planet.

Period!

When I print the article – it is too small. I can’t read it. What do I do now?

A: Great question. GenealogyBank makes it easy to enlarge any page or article.

Newspapers over the past 4 centuries have been printed in all shapes and sizes. That is particularly true of Colonial American newspapers.

GenealogyBank captures each article and page and displays them for you online – making it easy for you to save them as an Adobe PDF document.

When you want print or save an article and you see that it is too small to be easily read – simply enlarge it using Adobe Acrobat.

Step One: Click on the PDF icon to open up the article as a PDF document.

Step Two: Use the zoom button to enlarge the article to the desired size.

Now you can easily read the article, copy, save or print it.

Look closely at this example – an account of the statue of King George III being torn down and made into bullets – Connecticut Journal 17 July 1776 page 1.
On July 9, 1776, after the Declaration of Independence was read to the American army in New York City, the soldiers rushed to the foot of Broadway at the Bowling Green. As depicted in this engraving, they had the assistance of free Blacks or slaves in pulling down the statue of King George III. The lead statue was later brought to Connecticut, where it was made into bullets.”

GenealogyBank brings you:
▬ More Colonial American Newspapers than any other source
▬ Over 3,800 newspapers
▬ 1690 to Today


Join with us – sign up today.

It’s a great day for genealogy.


Happy Independence Day!

Read about it – as it happened in GenealogyBank.
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William Montgomery Clemens (1860-1931)

Genealogists who made a difference

William Montgomery Clemens (1860-1931)
was a prolific genealogist and writer. Nephew to the more famous Samuel Clemens (1835-1910) – he was also a newspaper man and author. William M. Clemens started writing for the Pittsburgh Leader in 1879 and continued his research & writing for more than five decades.

(Illus. Samuel Clemens/Mark Twain – 2nd from right).

(Click here to see original Obituary – Trenton Evening Times 25 Nov. 1931)


A prolific writer, he was the author of well over 100 books and hundreds of essays and newspaper articles.


His regular column – “Notes on American Ancestry and Revolutionary Records” regularly appeared as the “Genealogical Department” in the Columbia, SC newspaper – the State.


Click Here to search all of the back issues of the State (Columbia, SC) newspaper 1891-1922

Over 80 of Clemens’ genealogy columns appeared in the Star.

Each one has genealogical details & information for families from across the country.

He regularly received questions from his readers and posted them to this column.

GenealogyBank has added a new feature – Ask the Genealogist!

Have a question about GenealogyBank or hit a brick wall with your family history research? Write us and let us know.

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How do I find articles on Blacks in GenealogyBank?

I received an interesting question this morning. How do I find articles on Blacks in GenealogyBank?

I have read thousands of articles on Blacks in the old newspapers, books and documents. But, what would be the best search strategies to focus on just those articles?

It would be to look for specific names and keyword search terms associated with Blacks over the past 300 years.

Search for individuals by name like “Martin Luther King”. Click here to read the Dallas Morning News 5 April 1968 when he was killed.

TIP: Put names in quotes – “Martin Luther King” – so that your search will focus in on just articles where the person you are searching for is mentioned.

When former slave John Wiley died in 1918 it was a banner headline and a front page story in the Belleville News Democrat (20 May 1918). Click here to read the article.

You should also use keyword search terms that were used over the past 300 years. For example terms like: slave, slavery, African-American, NAACP, AME Church; and Civil Rights Movement will generate millions of hits in GenealogyBank.

Since funerals are often held at churches – a search term like “AME Church” brings up tens of thousands of obituaries for funerals held at one of the many African-Methodist Episcopal churches across the country.

You will then want to narrow down your search results by state, specific newspaper or by date range.

Whether you are searching for your ancestor’s in today’s newspaper or the last century you will depend on GenealogyBank to get the job done.

Over 3,800 newspapers, all 50 States, 1690-Today

Join with us today!

Your support makes it possible for us to add more newspapers every month!
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John Fuller longtime leader in Internet Genealogy has passed away.

I was alerted to John Fuller’s passing by DearMYRTLE. Others in the genealogy community have sent me items to include in writing about him. His complete obituary will be posted later this weekend.
John Fuller was well known in the genealogy community for his landmark website – Genealogy Resources on the Internet – that made it easy to find “Genealogy Mailing Lists” and other resources online. He started that site back in 1995. That seems so long ago now.

A viewing and visitation will be held this coming Tuesday, June 23 from 2:00 – 4:00 pm at the
Murphy Funeral Home; 4510 Wilson Blvd.; Arlington, VA

Per his sister Cynthia, “John would not want flowers” – she suggested memorial gifts to the American Cancer Society.

(Photo supplied by the family – John was a career Navy Officer in the Submarine Service)
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