Search Revolutionary War Records Online & Share Your Finds

With Memorial Day, Flag Day and July 4th fresh in our memory, genealogists often think about their Revolutionary War ancestors.

American Revolutionary War Newspapers Collage

Revolutionary War Newspaper Articles from GenealogyBank.com

Remember that GenealogyBank has a strong collection of historical newspapers and records from the 1700s and 1800s. Discover your early American ancestry in millions of records from the Revolutionary period.

Let’s honor the lives of each one of our Revolutionary War ancestors.

Between now and the end of the year we will be posting articles and obituaries about Revolutionary War soldiers. The American Revolutionary War started 238 years ago.

Write in and tell us about your Revolutionary War ancestor. Let’s recognize and remember 238 Revolutionary War soldiers in the days ahead. Let’s all do our part in making sure the memories of these brave Revolutionary War heroes are not lost.

Please post your genealogy research finds here in the blog’s comments section.

Celebrate Independence Day by Honoring Our American Ancestors

Cheers to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness—and to our brave American ancestors who fought for our freedom! Amidst the festivities and fireworks of this 4th of July holiday, take time to remember those heroic American revolutionaries that came before us, boldly paving the paths for our futures.

To The People of the United 13 Colonies - July 6, 1776

Freeman’s Journal (Portsmouth, New Hampshire), 6 July 1776, page 2.

GenealogyBank is one of the best online resources available to trace your family history back to your American Colonial and Revolutionary roots. Our historical archives contain hundreds of thousands of articles from the Colonial and Revolutionary periods. Many of these records from the 1600s and 1700s are exclusive to our online collections, making GenealogyBank a prime location to explore your early American ancestry.

Happy 4th of July, 2013, to all our fellow Americans! Raise your head, your flag, your glass and salute each other and our ancestors. Dig into GenealogyBank’s genealogy records and discover the early American heroes in your family tree.

To read the above historical newspaper article about the Declaration of Independence in full, visit To The People of the Thirteen Colonies.

Thomas Hill—American Revolutionary War Minuteman Hero Gone

“Hardly a man is now alive

Who remembers that famous day and year.”

—Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

In searching through early 19th Century newspapers, time and again we find historical obituaries about the passing of “Revolutionary Heroes,” as America’s newspapers recorded the honored service of those who fought to secure this country’s freedom from England.

This 1851 American Revolutionary War soldier’s obituary of Thomas Hill is a good example.

Thomas Hill Revolutionary War Hero Obituary - Massachusetts Spy Newspaper 1851

Massachusetts Spy (Worcester, Massachusetts), 15 July 1851, page 3.

This soldier’s obituary says of Thomas Hill: “He was in the battle of Concord, and was on Bunker Hill, but not in the engagement.”

Wait—he was there at the battle but didn’t fight?

Why was he given a pension by the U.S. federal government and called a “Revolutionary Hero” in this historical obituary if he was there at the battle but not engaged in the fighting?

Digging deeper in GenealogyBank I found this old newspaper article profiling Thomas Hill when he was 89, one year before he died. It was published in the New Hampshire Gazette (Portsmouth, New Hampshire), 23 April 1850, page 2, giving more details about his military service.

Thomas Hill New Hampshire Gazette NewspaperSo he was at the Battle of Concord as a 14-year-old boy and also at the Battle of Bunker Hill “with his father and eldest brother Abraham.” They were part of “the volunteer minute men who fought.”

Thomas Hill went on to fight in “two campaigns in the Jerseys and New York.”

Thomas Hill was honored along with “four other survivors, being all that could be found in the country around who were active in the scenes of 1775.”

And honored he was—the historical newspaper article went on to say:

Thomas Hill New Hampshire Gazette Newspaper 1850We can picture the old Revolutionary War veteran being escorted by the grateful citizens of West Cambridge over the same route used by the British when they attacked Lexington and Concord.

It calls to mind the words of the poet Longfellow:

“Listen my children and you shall hear

Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,

On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;

Hardly a man is now alive

Who remembers that famous day and year.”

Longfellow’s immortal words were published in January 1861, 11 years after the 1850 tribute to Thomas Hill. Perhaps he was inspired by this celebration honoring Hill and the other four remaining men “who remembered that famous day and year.”

GenealogyBank gives us the key opportunity to dig in and find the details of the thousands who served as soldiers in the American Revolutionary War. Search GenealogyBank’s newspaper archives and document your ancestors—don’t let their stories be lost.

The World Was Your Ancestor’s Oyster: Food in Family History

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this guest blog post, Gena explores one of her many interests: the connection of food and cooking to family history, revealing how much oysters were part of our ancestors’ diets.

What did your ancestors eat? Is this something you ever ponder? As family historians, the actual everyday activities of our ancestors can help to bring the dates and places we research to life.

In some cases the food our ancestors ate is quite different from what we are accustomed to today. With the lack of refrigeration and transportation, it’s no surprise that there were regional differences in cuisine. Considering the limited ability to transport and preserve ingredients, the variety of what was available to harvest locally, and the food preferences of local ethnic/immigrant populations, it is not surprising that the food that was served in various areas could be extremely different. A specialty enjoyed by those living in one region of the United States was all but unknown in another. While to some extent this is still true of modern cuisine today, as you can travel to different regions of the United States and taste local favorites not served where you live, these food differences are not as dramatic as they were 100 years ago.

So what were some food commonalities? Well there were many American foods that were feasted upon across the regions. One such food that was enjoyed by almost all Americans in the nineteenth century was oysters. Today oysters, depending on where you live, are usually a delicacy because of the price they command. It would also not be unusual to find people who have never even tried an oyster, raw or cooked.  In the nineteenth century oysters were everyday food items that were inexpensive and plentiful. They were the food of the common person.

Newspaper advertisements hint at the massive amounts of oysters available to our ancestors. Consider this 1874 newspaper advertisement from the Oregonian which lists several places to eat and obtain oysters.

Old Vintage Advertisement for Oysters - Oregonian Newspaper  1874

Oregonian (Portland, Oregon), 16 October 1874, page 5.

Street vendors, oyster houses, saloons, restaurants and home cooks prepared oysters in various, often creative ways. Oysters were served in every way imaginable including ways we are familiar with today like raw and fried. Interesting ways to serve oysters could be found in the era’s cookbooks including pickled oysters, oyster ketchup and one recipe that called for oysters to be served with shortcake.[i]

Consider this newspaper article which provides 11 ways to cook oysters that “if adhered to will bring cheer to the family board.” Note that this article was printed in a Kentucky newspaper—not exactly known today for its seafood. Yet this historical 1913 article tells “how best to serve the succulent bivalve [oysters], perhaps the most universally popular dish of the American table.”

How To Cook Oysters Old Recipe - Lexington Herald Newspaper 1913

Lexington Herald (Lexington, Kentucky), 19 October 1913, section 4, page 3.

There were also “mock oyster” recipes for those who were unable to obtain oysters. These oyster recipes substituted different ingredients for oysters including corn, mashed potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplant. Women could cook dishes such as “Mock Oyster Soup,” “Mock Oyster Sauce,” “Mock Oyster Stew” and just plain “Mock Oysters.” While the appearance of a “mock” recipe in a cookbook might connote that the item was difficult to obtain or expensive, this was not necessarily so in the case of the oyster.

As oyster beds became contaminated and overfished in the early 1900s, oysters began to cease being eaten as an everyday food and became more of a delicacy. No longer was the oyster part of America’s everyday diet.

To learn more about America’s love affair with oysters see the history The Big Oyster. History on the Half Shell by Mark Kurlansky.


[i] Stavely, Keith W. F., and Kathleen‎ Fitzgerald‎. America’s Founding Food. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: University of North Carolina Press, 2004, pg. 108. Viewed on Google Books 1 July 2012.

Henry ‘Hank’ Aaron: Baseball Superstar, Humanitarian—& Gentleman

As regular readers of this blog know, GenealogyBank’s historical newspaper archives are a great resource to research your family history and fill in details on your family tree. These newspapers are also a terrific window into the past, letting us learn more about important people and events in our nation’s history.

For example, let’s see what these old newspapers have to tell us about one of the outstanding athletes in American history: Henry “Hammerin’ Hank” Aaron, the superstar who played baseball in Milwaukee and Atlanta for 23 seasons, from 1954 to 1976. Aaron is famous as the baseball player who broke Babe Ruth’s all-time home run record of 714—and, as expected, there is plenty of newspaper coverage of his historic home run and other baseball exploits.

The newspapers also tell us much more about his life than this: in addition to being a rare and gifted American athlete, Henry ‘Hank’ Aaron was a humanitarian—and a true gentleman.

The sports media and baseball fans were whipped into a frenzy as Hank Aaron approached Babe Ruth’s magical number in the 1973 Major League baseball season. Although 39 years old that summer (an age when most baseball players have retired) Hank Aaron was on target, hitting 40 home runs…but ended the year with 713 home runs, still short of the goal of 715. He had to wait all winter for another opportunity to break baseball’s home run record the next spring.

When the 1974 season began, Aaron wasted no time. He hit the record-tying 714th home run on his first at-bat that year, in Cincinnati. On April 8 the Atlanta Braves returned to Atlanta for their home opener, and 53,775 wildly cheering fans attended the game hoping Aaron would get the record that night. Hammerin’ Hank did not let the crowd down, hitting home run number 715 in the fourth inning. He received a thunderous standing ovation from the Braves’ baseball fans while fireworks lit up the sky above the stadium.

Hank Aaron hammers historic 715 homerun

Augusta Chronicle (Augusta, Georgia), 9 April 1974, page 1.

In addition to details of the baseball game itself and Aaron’s record 715th home run, the newspaper article provides this detail:

Aaron broke away from his mates and rushed to a special box adjacent to the Atlanta dugout where he clutched his wife, Billye, and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Aaron, of Mobile, Ala.

“I never knew she could hug so tight,” Aaron said of his mother.

The following newspaper article tells us something about the character of Hank Aaron. Although he was one of the greatest American baseball players ever, he kept his ego in check; Aaron was widely recognized as a good teammate and a quiet, respectful man—a true gentleman.

Hank Aaron kept his word on the 715th homerun

Wichita Times (Wichita, Kansas), 2 May 1974, page 5, (African American Newspapers).

As this newspaper article relates, Hank Aaron was sensitive to the disruption his teammates had to endure while the press thronged around him night after night in 1973-74 covering his chase of the home run record. When it was finally over and the champagne celebration in the Atlanta locker room after the game was ready, Aaron thought immediately of his teammates:

The Braves had opened the champagne and were ready to pour, but Hank Aaron had something he wanted to say first to all his teammates.

“Thank you for being patient,” he said, his sincerity moving them. “Thank you for putting up with all that you have—the newspapermen, the photographers and all the other distractions. I know how difficult it was sometimes, and I appreciate the patience you’ve shown.”

Hank Aaron doesn’t make many speeches. Everybody in the room knew he meant this one.

Away from the spotlight and the glare of media publicity, Aaron had another career: he was a great humanitarian. He devoted countless hours to helping others, especially children, as shown in the following newspaper article.

Hank Aaron Goes to Bat for Easter Seals

Milwaukee Star (Milwaukee, Wisconsin), 9 August 1973, page 8, (African American Newspapers).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newspaper archives provide all sorts of surprising stories about the life of the person we’re researching. How many people know that Henry Aaron was once a mayor?

All Black Alabama Town Makes Hank Aaron Mayor

Wichita Times (Wichita, Kansas), 13 March 1975, page 1, (African American Newspapers).

Hank Aaron was born in Alabama, and in 1975 he was:

…sworn in as honorary mayor of Hobson City during ceremonies in which 75-year-old northeast Alabama all-black town dedicates new Town Hall.

There was a dark side to Hank Aaron’s pursuit of Babe Ruth’s home run record—and the newspapers covered that as well: racism raised its ugly head. Throughout the 1973 Major League baseball season, during the offseason, and again in 1974, Aaron received hate letters mixed in with the supportive letters that were pouring into the Atlanta Braves’ mailbox. Some even sent him death threats.

What pursuit of baseball homerun record has meant for Hank Aaron: People listen

Augusta Chronicle (Augusta, Georgia), 9 April 1974, page 11.

In the above very revealing newspaper article, Hank Aaron opens up about the threats he’d been facing:

Aaron’s hero off the field is Dr. Martin Luther King. “He could walk with kings and talk with presidents,” said Aaron. “He wasn’t for lootings and bombings and fights but he wasn’t afraid of violence, either. He was 20 years ahead of his times.”

King’s death by assassination cannot, of course, be forgotten by Aaron. Sometimes Aaron wonders about that, too. He says that among the hundreds of letters he receives weekly, many are threats on his life.

“But I can’t think about that,” he says. “If I’m a target, then I’m a target. I can only worry about doing my job, and doing it good.”

This same newspaper article says of Aaron:

He has recently become identified with black causes. For example, he is now a close personal friend of the Rev. Jesse Jackson, a leading young black spokesman. Aaron, in winter, now is the organizer of a celebrity bowling tournament in Atlanta with proceeds going to research on sickle cell anemia, a disease that afflicts black people.

And this:

Aaron is also outspoken on the progress, or lack of it, for blacks in baseball. He says that blacks are stagnating. “Whatever so-called progress there is—like blacks staying in the same hotels with the white players—this came about from civil rights legislation, not from any leveling action by baseball,” says Aaron.

“Why aren’t there even no black managers? Why aren’t there even no black third base coaches? There are token first base coaches—a few. But what does a first base coach do? He has no duties. No responsibilities. Nothing. Absolutely nothing. He’s not expected to have any intelligence.”

Aaron still feels some of the clichés of being black. He remembers that once blacks were considered “too gutless” to be able to take the pressures of day-in, day-out major league baseball.

“Jackie Robinson changed a lot of those beliefs,” says Aaron. “His courage and intelligence showed what the black man could be made of.

Hank Aaron’s stance on black rights is explored further in the following newspaper article.

Hank Aaron: Baseball Still Not Doing Enough To Give Equal Opportunities To Minorities

USA Monitor (Fort Worth, Texas), 1 March 1993, page 17, (African American Newspapers).

As you can see, newspaper archives are filled with stories you may never have heard before. You can discover little known facts, view pictures and learn more about the personal lives of famous people and your family members with newspapers.  Have fun searching our newspaper archives for details about celebrities and your own ancestors—you never know what you might find!

 

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In addition to over 705 million articles—each of which can be printed and preserved for your family heritage — GenealogyBank also offers over 32 million modern obituaries, more than 87 million death records, over 253,000 reports including military lists, pension requests and the largest collection of U.S. serial set documents online.

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48 More newspapers added to GenealogyBank

GenealogyBank adds 48 more newspapers
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Kodiak Daily Mirror (Kodiak, AK) Death Notices: 02/01/2010 – Current
Birmingham Times (Birmingham, AL) Death Notices: 04/01/2010 – Current
Pinal Nugget, The (San Manuel, AZ) Death Notices: 05/14/2010 – Current
Midway Driller (Taft, CA) Death Notices: 10/05/2009 – Current
Oakland Post, The (Oakland, CA) Death Notices: 03/28/2010 – Current
Milford Beacon (Milford, DE) Death Notices: 10/23/2009 – Current
Times-Herald, The (Newnan, GA) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Abbeville Meridional (Abbeville, LA) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Rayne Acadian-Tribune (Rayne, LA) Death Notices: 10/06/2009 – Current
Richland Beacon-News (Rayville, LA) Death Notices: 10/08/2009 – Current
Hanson Express (Hanson, MA) Death Notices: 05/06/2010 – Current
North Attleborough Free Press, The (North Attleborough, MA) Death Notices: 10/03/2009 – Current
Coldwater Daily Reporter (Coldwater, MI) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Jefferson Post (West Jefferson, NC) Death Notices: 10/05/2009 – Current
Atlanticville (Long Branch, Oakhurst, NJ) Death Notices: 12/29/2009 – Current
East Brunswick Sentinel (East Brunswick, NJ) Death Notices: 01/20/2010 – Current
Examiner (Millstone, Englishtown, Allentown, NJ) Death Notices: 03/08/2010 – Current
Hub, The (Red Bank, NJ) Death Notices: 01/05/2010 – Current
Independent, The (Middletown, Hazlet, NJ) Death Notices: 01/05/2010 – Current
North-South Brunswick Sentinel (North Brunswick, South Brunswick, NJ) Death Notices: 01/13/2010 – Current
Suburban (Old Bridge, NJ) Death Notices: 01/06/2010 – Current
Tri-Town News (Howell, Jackson, Lakewood, Plumstead, NJ) Death Notices: 01/16/2010 – Current
Daily Sparks Tribune, The (Sparks, NV) Death Notices: 11/12/2009 – Current
Cooperstown Crier, The (Cooperstown, NY) Death Notices: 04/21/2010 – Current
Courier, The (Bath, NY) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Journal-Register, The (Medina, NY) Death Notices: 03/17/2010 – Current
Long Beach Herald (Long Beach, NY) Death Notices: 04/01/2010 – Current
Lynbrook – East Rockaway Herald (Lynbrook, NY) Death Notices: 03/28/2010 – Current
Riverdale Press, The (Bronx, NY) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Villager, The (New York, NY) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Antlers American, The (Antlers, OK) Death Notices: 03/27/2010 – Current
Express Star, The (Chickasha, OK) Death Notices: 03/17/2010 – Current
Daily Press, The (St. Marys, PA) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Dispatch, The (Walterboro, SC) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Blount Today (Maryville, TN) Death Notices: 12/23/2009 – Current
Morgan County News (Wartburg, TN) Death Notices: 04/22/2010 – Current
Bay City Tribune, The (Bay City, TX) Death Notices: 10/03/2009 – Current
Greenville Herald-Banner (Greenville, TX) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Northeast Herald (San Antonio, TX) Death Notices: 10/18/2009 – Current
Journal Press, The (King George, VA) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Shenandoah Valley-Herald (Woodstock, VA) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Valley Banner, The (Elkton, VA) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Warren Sentinel (Front Royal, VA) Death Notices: 01/16/2010 – Current
Progress-Index, The (Petersburg, VA) Obituaries: 10/31/2001 – 08/29/2005 Death Notices: 11/05/2001 – 08/29/2005

Statesman-Examiner (Colville, WA) Death Notices: 10/08/2009 – Current
Brookfield-Elm Grove NOW (Brookfield, WI) Death Notices: 10/04/2009 – Current
Kettle Moraine Index (Dousman, WI) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Oconomowoc Enterprise (Oconomowoc, WI) Death Notices: 03/27/2010 – Current
Sussex Sun (Hartland, WI) Death Notices: 10/03/2009 – Current
.

More newspapers go online

GenealogyBank adds 40+ more newspapers

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Dearborn County Register, The (Lawrenceburg, IN)
04/19/2010 – Current

Ohio County News, The – Rising Sun Recorder (Rising Sun, IN)
05/01/2010 – Current

Salem News, The (Beverly, MA)
05/12/2010 – Current:


Advocate Tribune (Granite Falls, MN)
10/02/2009 – Current

Montevideo American-News (Montevido, MN)
10/02/2009 – Current

Redwood Falls Gazette (Redwood Falls, MN)
10/03/2009 – Current

St. James Plaindealer (St. James, MN)
10/02/2009 – Current

Hackensack Chronicle (Hackensack, NJ)
10/02/2009 – Current

Mahwah Suburban News (Mahwah, NJ)
10/02/2009 – Current

News Transcript (Manalapan, NJ)
03/10/2010 – Current

Teaneck Suburbanite (Teaneck, NJ)
10/02/2009 – Current

Twin-Boro News (Bergenfield, Dumont, New Milford, NJ)
10/02/2009 – Current

Verona-Cedar Grove Times (Verona, Cedar Grove, NJ)
10/02/2009 – Current

Batavian, The (Batavia, NY)
03/28/2010 – Current

Daily Star, The (Oneonta, NY)
04/21/2010 – Current

Forward, The (New York, NY)
10/04/2009 – Current

Livingston County News (Geneseo, NY)
03/27/2010 – Current

Niagara Gazette (Niagara Falls, NY)
05/08/2010 – Current

Press-Republican (Plattsburgh, NY)
01/28/2010 – Current

Tonawanda News (North Tonawanda, Tonawanda, NY)
03/17/2010 – Current

Union-Sun & Journal (Lockport, NY)
03/23/2010 – Current

Tahlequah Daily Press (Tahlequah, OK)
05/06/2010 – Current

Waurika News Democrat (Waurika, OK)
03/27/2010 – Current

Woodward News (Woodward, OK)
05/01/2010 – Current

Keizertimes (Keizer, OR)
10/24/2009 – Current

Daily Item, The (Sunbury, PA)
04/22/2010 – Current

Tribune-Democrat, The (Johnstown, PA)
01/18/2010 – Current

Georgetown Times, The (Georgetown, SC)
10/02/2009 – Current

Crossville Chronicle (Crossville, TN)
06/09/2010 – Current

Athens Daily Review (Athens, TX)
02/04/2010 – Current

Cedar Creek Pilot (Gun Barrel City, TX)
05/12/2010 – Current


Commerce Journal (Commerce, TX)
02/17/2010 – Current

Huntsville Item, The (Huntsville, TX)
02/19/2010 – Current

Jacksonville Daily Progress (Jacksonville, TX)
02/05/2010 – Current

Mineral Wells Index (Mineral Wells, TX)
02/15/2010 – Current

Port Arthur News (Port Arthur, TX)
12/27/2009 – Current

Rockwall County Herald Banner (Greenville, TX)
03/27/2010 – Current

Royse City Herald Banner (Royse City, TX)
03/28/2010 – Current

Weatherford Democrat, The (Weatherford, TX)
02/03/2010 – Current

Wichita Falls Times Record News (Wichita Falls, TX)
02/27/2010 – Current

Stafford County Sun (Stafford, VA)
10/07/2009 – Current

.

Newspapers Go Online -

GenealogyBank keeps on growing!

GenealogyBank.com added more newspaper coverage for over 1,600 newspapers – in all 50 States this week.

Here is just a list of some of the new content that has been added.
Search GenealogyBank now!

AK
Juneau
Daily Record-Miner. 1911-01-05 to 1911-05-04

AL
Birmingham
Wide-Awake*. 1900-01-24
AL
Mobile
Mobile Register. 1970-01-04 to 1978-11-30

AR
Garden City
Jonesboro Evening Sun. 1905-12-02 to 1921-08-18
AR
Little Rock
Arkansas Gazette. 1846-11-02 to 1872-05-19

AZ
San Manuel
San Manuel Miner, The. 03/27/2010 to Current
AZ
Tucson
Amigos. 1976-08-03
AZ
Tucson
Tucsonense. 1917-01-03 to 1922-12-23

CA
Benicia
California Gazette. 1851-08-23 to 1852-01-24
CA
Los Angeles
Prensa. 1932-04-03
CA
Los Angeles
Regeneracion. 1913-01-25 to 1914-02-14
CA
Oakland
Oakland Sunshine*. 1915-03-20 to 1922-02-25
CA
Sacramento
Sacramento Weekly Union. 1851-10-31 to 1853-04-15
CA
San Francisco
Grafico Internacional*. 1937-02-01 to 1937-04-01
CA
San Francisco
Hispano America. 1923-08-25 to 1925-10-10
CA
San Francisco
San Francisco Vindicator*. 1887-05-02 to 1889-02-16
CA
San Francisco
Weekly Pacific News. 1849-12-31 to 1851-04-01

CO
Colorado Springs
Gazette-Telegraph. 1904-09-29 to 1907-08-02

CT
Hartford
Hartford Daily Courant. 1868-04-07 to 1876-12-30
CT
Hartford
Hartford Daily Courant. 1852-02-20 to 1866-05-29
CT
New London
New London Daily Chronicle. 1850-09-03 to 1852-06-23

DC
Washington
Leader*. 1888-12-08 to 1889-12-21
DC
Washington
Washington Bee. 1882-06-10 to 1920-06-26

FL
Jasper
Jasper News, The. 03/27/2010 to Current
FL
Mayo
Mayo Free Press, The. 03/17/2010 to Current
FL
Tampa
Internacional. 1941-02-27
FL
Tampa
Traduccion Prensa. 1946-05-06

GA
Americus
Americus Times-Recorder. 2010-05-06 to Current
GA
Augusta
Augusta Chronicle. 1841-10-19 to 1860-12-30
GA
Augusta
Loyal Georgian*. 1866-01-20 to 1868-02-15
GA
Savannah
Savannah Weekly Echo*. 1883-08-26 to 1884-02-10

HI
Homolulu
Afro-Hawaii News*. 1987-06-01 to 1991-12-31

IA
Des Moines
Iowa State Bystander*. 1896-11-13 to 1900-12-28
IA
Des Moines
Weekly Avalanche*. 1893-01-20
IA
Oskaloosa
Oskaloosa Herald. 2010-03-24 to Current
IA
Ottumwa
Ottumwa Courier, The. 2010-03-05 to Current

IL
Chicago
Latin Times. 1958-10-04 to 1972-05-05
IL
Chicago
Sunday Times. 1874-07-19
IL
Effingham
Effingham Daily News. 2010-01-29 to Current

IN
Indianapolis
Freeman. 1899-08-17 to 1916-11-25
IN
Indianapolis
Recorder*. 1899-01-07 to 1900-12-29
IN
New Albany
Weekly Review*. 1881-04-16

KS
Baxter Springs
Southern Argus*. 1891-06-18 to 1892-02-04
KS
Coffeyville
Afro-American Advocate. 1891-09-02 to 1893-09-01
KS
Coffeyville
American*. 1898-04-23 t0 1899-04-23
KS
Coffeyville
Kansas Blackman*. 1894-04-20 to 1894-06-29
KS
Lawrence
Historic Times*. 1891-07-11 to 1891-11-14
KS
Leavenworth
Leavenworth Advocate. 1888-08-18 to 1891-08-22
KS
Leavenworth
Leavenworth Herald*. 1894-02-07 to 1896-12-26
KS
Nicodemus
Nicodemus Cyclone*. 1887-12-30 to 1888-09-07
KS
Nicodemus
Nicodemus Enterprise*. 1887-08-17 to 1887-12-23
KS
Parsons
Parsons Weekly Blade*. 1892-09-24 to 1900-12-28
KS
Topeka
American Citizen. 1897-01-29 to 1902-05-23
KS
Topeka
American Citizen. 1889-01-11 to 1889-06-21
KS
Topeka
Benevolent Banner*. 1887-05-21 to 1887-10-22
KS
Topeka
Colored Patriot*. 1882-04-20 to 1882-06-22
KS
Topeka
Evening Call*. 1893-06-13 to 1893-07-08
KS
Topeka
Herald of Kansas*. 1880-01-30 to 1880-06-11
KS
Topeka
Plaindealer. 1900-01-26
KS
Wichita
National Baptist World*. 1894-08-31 to 1894-11-23
KS
Wichita
People’s Friend*. 1894-05-24 to 1894-05-24
KS
Wichita
Wichita Times*. 1972-01-11 to 1977-09-22

LA
New Orleans
L’Union*. 1862-09-27 to 1864-07-19
LA
New Orleans
Times-Picayune. 1940-06-22 to 1975-07-28
LA
New Orleans
Times-Picayune. 1866-02-13 to 1879-12-16
LA
New Orleans
Weekly Louisianian. 1882-01-14
LA
New Orleans
Weekly Pelican. 1887-01-29 to 1889-08-31
LA
St. Martinville
Echo*. 1873-03-15

MA
Amherst
Amherst Bulletin. 2009-10-02 to Current
MA
Boston
Boston Daily Advertiser. 1874-01-01 to 1874-04-30
MA
Lawrence
Eagle-Tribune, The. 2010-05-12 to Current
MA
Provincetown
Provincetown Banner. 2009-10-02 to Current
MA
Springfield
Springfield Republican. 1925-02-01 to 1946-09-26
MA
Springfield
Springfield Republican. 1886-12-02
MA
Springfield
Springfield Union. 1947-04-01 to 1963-02-15
MA
Worcester
National Aegis. 1825-01-12 to 1827-12-12

MD
Baltimore
Afro-American*. 1893-04-29 to 1898-03-26
MD
Baltimore
Baltimore American. 1905-06-18 to 1910-04-24
MD
Baltimore
Race Standard*. 1897-01-02 to 1897-01-16

MI
Detroit
Plaindealer. 1889-09-27 to 1892-11-18
MI
Grand Rapids
Grand Rapids Press, The. 2010-05-12 to Current
MI
Holland
Holland Sentinel, The. 2009-10-02 to Current

MN
Minneapolis
Afro-American Advance*. 1899-05-27 to 1900-11-17
MN
Sleepy Eye
Sleepy Eye Herald Dispatch. 2009-10-02 to Current
MN
St. Paul
Broad Axe. 1894-02-01 to 1902-06-12
MN
St. Paul
Negro World*. 1900-03-10 to 1900-06-09
MN
St. Paul
St. Paul Daily Pioneer. 1855-11-01 to 1855-12-22
MN
St. Paul
Western Appeal*. 1885-06-13 to 1888-12-29

MO
Kansas City
Cosmopolita. 1917-12-08 to 1919-11-15
MO
Kansas City
Kansas City Times. 1891-12-23 to 1895-10-16
MO
Kansas City
Rising Son*. 1903-01-16 to 1907-12-28
MO
Sedalia
Sedalia Times*. 1901-08-31 to 1903-12-19
MO
St. James
St. James Leader Journal. 2009-10-02 to Current
MO
St. Louis
St. Louis Palladium*. 1903-01-10 to 1907-10-05

NC
Asheboro
Courier-Tribune, The. 2010-04-06 to Current
NC
Boone
Watauga Democrat, The. 2009-10-02 to Current
NC
Littleton
True Reformer*. 1900-07-25
NC
Nashville
Nashville Graphic, The. 2010-01-28 to Current
NC
Raleigh
Gazette*. 1893-12-16 to 1898-02-19

NE
Omaha
Afro-American Sentinel. 1896-04-25 to 1899-03-25
NE
Omaha
Enterprise*. 1895-08-10 to 1897-07-03
NE
Omaha
Progress*. 1890-03-22 to 1891-03-07

NH
Concord
New Hampshire Patriot. 1879-06-26 to 1881-02-17
NH
Exeter
Freeman’s Oracle. 1786-07-01 to 1789-07-28

NJ
Flemington
Hunterdon County Democrat. 2009-10-02 to Current
NJ
Wayne
Wayne Today. 2009-10-14 to Current

NM
Albuquerque
Bandera Americana. 1903-10-01 to 1903-11-06
NM
Albuquerque
Daily Citizen. 1887-03-16 to 1892-12-31
NM
Albuquerque
Daily Times*. 1893-06-14
NM
Albuquerque
Evening Citizen. 1893-06-29 to 1893-06-29
NM
Las Cruces
Labrador. 1904-12-30
NM
Las Cruces
Tiempo. 1885-04-30 to 1902-04-02
NM
Las Vegas
Misionero Bautista: Organo Oficial de la Convencion Bautista Hispano-Americana de Nuevo Mexico. 1943-12-21 to 1951-08-21
NM
Mesilla
Mesilla News. 1879-04-19 to 1884-02-09
NM
Mountainair
Independent. 1918-02-02 to 1920-09-25
NM
Santa Fe
Daily New Mexican. 1871-04-15 to 1875-06-30
NM
Santa Fe
Santa Fe Weekly New Mexican and Livestock Journal. 1888-05-31 to 1895-09-26
NM
Socorro
Defensor del Pueblo. 1924-12-19 to 1938-02-11
NM
Springer
Colfax County Stockman. 1910-07-23 to 1911-06-10

NY
Albany
Albany Evening Journal. 1857-07-23 to 1876-12-13
NY
Brooklyn
Colonia Latina*. 1938-01-08
NY
Garden City
Eco. 1930-11-15
NY
New York
Morning Telegraph. 1877-12-09
NY
New York
New York Herald-Tribune. 1874-11-02 to 1888-11-02
NY
New York
Cosas*. 1931-12-03
NY
New York
Doctrina de Marti. 1897-04-30 to 1897-08-31
NY
New York
Ecos de Nueva York. 1954-10-10
NY
New York
New York Age*. 1889-11-02 to 1892-11-19
NY
New York
New York Freeman*. 1886-01-02 to 1887-10-08
NY
New York
Western Star*. 1900-01-27

OH
Cincinnati
Cincinnati Daily Gazette. 1867-04-13 to 1881-02-03
OH
Cleveland
Cleveland Gazette*. 1883-12-01 to 1941-08-09
OH
Cleveland
Plain Dealer. 1947-11-23 to 1975-12-10
OH
Cleveland
Plain Dealer. 1846-02-27 to 1858-10-30

OR
Portand
Oregonian. 1917-07-03 to 1918-08-12
OR
Portland
New Age*. 1900-01-27 to 1902-09-20
OR
Portland
Oregonian. 1925-08-22 to 1971-11-20
OR
Portland
Portland New Age*. 1905-12-23 to 1907-03-30

PA
Harrisburg
State Journal*. 1883-12-13 to 1885-01-24
PA
Philadelphia
Aurora General Advertiser. 1796-03-24
PA
Philadelphia
Philadelphia Inquirer. 1830-01-08 to 1831-12-28

SC
Charleston
South Carolina Leader*. 1865-10-07 to 1866-05-12
SC
Columbia
Southern Indicator*. 1921-02-21 to 1923-02-03

TN
Knoxville
Negro World*. 1887-10-15 to 1887-11-26

TX
Beaumont
Beaumont Enterprise and Journal. 1906-04-11 to 1911-09-23
TX
Brownsville
Cronista del Valle. 1925-01-23 to 1929-09-06
TX
Brownsville
Daily Cosmopolitan. 1884-09-10 to 1885-07-11
TX
Brownsville
Heraldo de Brownsville. 1937-12-30 to 1940-02-28
TX
Brownsville
Puerto. 1959-03-21
TX
Dallas
Dallas Morning News. 1979-11-11 to 1980-07-20
TX
Edinburg
Defensor. 1931-07-10
TX
El Paso
Clarin del Norte. 1906-08-11 to 1906-10-06
TX
El Paso
Continental. 1935-12-31 to 1960-03-08
TX
El Paso
Defensor*. 1894-09-24 to 1895-03-03
TX
El Paso
Sunday Herald. 1888-10-28 to 1889-05-18
TX
Fort Worth
Torchlight Appeal*. 1890-01-17 to 1890-02-22
TX
Houston
Gaceta Mexicana. 1928-05-15
TX
Kingsville
Notas de Kingsville*. 1957-05-16 to 1960-08-18
TX
Kingsville
Tex. Mex. Reflector. 1922-04-21 to 1939-01-21
TX
Laredo
Evolucion. 1917-06-30 to 1918-08-11
TX
San Antonio
Epoca. 1919-03-23 to 1927-05-08
TX
San Antonio
Pan American Labor Express. 1918-08-28 to 1918-11-13
TX
San Antonio
Regidor. 1913-08-14 to 1915-06-30

UT
Salt Lake City
Broad Ax. 1897-02-06 to 1899-12-23
UT
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake Telegram. 1907-10-04 to 1922-11-12

VA
Richmond
Reformer*. 1900-01-27
VA
Richmond
Richmond Planet*. 1895-03-02 to 1900-01-13

WA
Seattle
Seattle Daily Times. 1936-10-20 to 1984-12-31
WA
Seattle
Seattle Republican*. 1900-01-19
WA
Seattle
World*. 1899-01-04

WI
Milwaukee
Guardia. 1969-10-21 to 1975-08-01
WI
Milwaukee
Wisconsin Afro-American*. 1892-08-13 to 1892-11-19

Faith and Begorrah – Ireland 1901 Census is now live online.

Breaking News!
The National Archives of Ireland has just put the complete Irish 1901 Census online.

More Irish genealogy resources:
GenealogyBank – is packed with Irish American newspapers as well as birth announcements, marriage notices and obituaries.

GenealogyBank keeps on growing.

Search it now!