About Tony Pettinato

My name is Tony Pettinato, and I live in Deerfield, Mass. I did my undergraduate studies in English at Oberlin College, my graduate work in Journalism at UC Berkeley, and have been a reporter for six newspapers. For the past sixteen years I have worked at NewsBank, six of those as a managing editor for the U.S. Congressional Serial Set project – NewsBank’s acclaimed effort that digitized and indexed twelve million pages of primary source documents – that gratified my lifelong interest in American history. Currently, I am the Content Editor for GenealogyBank.

Gettysburg Address: Abraham Lincoln’s Monumental Speech

On the afternoon of 19 November 1863, President Abraham Lincoln stood to address a crowd of about 15,000 people gathered for the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. He followed the main speaker of the day, famed orator Edward Everett, who had just finished delivering a two-hour address that was well-received by the audience. Then President Lincoln spoke for only two minutes, delivering his ten-sentence “Gettysburg Address” that has gained enduring fame as one of the greatest speeches in American history.

photo of President Abraham Lincoln, 8 November 1863, 11 days before delivering the Gettysburg Address

Photo: President Abraham Lincoln, 8 November 1863, 11 days before delivering the Gettysburg Address. Credit: Alexander Gardner; Wikimedia Commons.

Gettysburg Ceremony of 1863

The ceremony that day was in honor of the dead who had fallen at the Battle of Gettysburg the first three days of July 1863, an incredibly bloody battle during the Civil War that ended the Confederacy’s invasion of the North, highlighted by the ferocious attack on the third day known as Pickett’s Charge. More than 7,500 military men and thousands of horses were killed during the three days’ fighting, and their rotting corpses stank in the hot July sun.

The deceased Civil War soldiers had been hastily buried in shallow graves on the battlefield, but 17 acres were later set aside for a proper cemetery, and the bodies were being transferred—Union dead only—to the new cemetery. (The Confederate dead were left in their battlefield graves until 1870-1873, when they were transferred to cemeteries in the South.)

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Now, four and a half months after the Gettysburg battle, the cemetery was being dedicated and Lincoln delivered his surprisingly short speech. He had been invited to “set apart these grounds to their sacred use by a few appropriate remarks” and Lincoln’s remarks were few indeed—yet powerful.

photo of the Lincoln Address Memorial, designed by Louis Henrick, with bust of Abraham Lincoln by Henry Kirke Bush-Brown, erected at the Gettysburg National Cemetery in 1912

Photo: The Lincoln Address Memorial, designed by Louis Henrick, with bust of Abraham Lincoln by Henry Kirke Bush-Brown, erected at the Gettysburg National Cemetery in 1912. Credit: CJC47; Wikimedia Commons.

Lincoln’s Famous Speech

It is impossible to know exactly what Lincoln said that day. There are five known manuscripts of his speech, but they have differences. Additionally, several newspapers reported the president’s speech, but these accounts all have variations as well. We will also never know how the crowd reacted to his speech. Accounts vary from no applause at all, to only polite applause, to long sustained applause.

Here is how the Albany Journal reported the dedication ceremony and Lincoln’s speech. Its account was based on the reporting of a New York Times reporter; that Republican-leaning paper was careful to note that Lincoln’s short speech was interrupted with applause five times, and claimed it was met with “long, continued applause” at its conclusion. It is interesting to note that not a word of the featured speaker Everett’s speech is quoted, but President Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address is quoted in its entirety.

article about President Abraham Lincoln delivering the Gettysburg Address, Albany Evening Journal newspaper article 20 November 1863

Albany Evening Journal (Albany, New York), 20 November 1863, page 2

The 1800s news article reported:

“Gettysburg, Nov. 19

“The ceremonies attending the dedication of the National Cemetery commenced this morning by a grand military and civic display, under command of Maj. Gen. Couch. The line of march was taken up at 10 o’clock, and the procession marched through the principal streets to the cemetery, where military formed in line and saluted the President. At a quarter-past eleven the head of the procession arrived at the main stand. The President and members of the Cabinet, together with the chief military and civic dignitaries, took positions on the stand. The President seated himself between Mr. Seward and Mr. Everett, after a reception marked with the respect and perfect silence due to the solemnity of the occasion, every man in the immense gathering uncovering on his appearance.

“The military then formed in line, extending around the stand, the area between the stand and military being occupied by civilians, comprising about fifteen thousand people, and including men, women, and children. The attendance of ladies was quite large. The military escort comprised one squadron of cavalry, two batteries of artillery, and a regiment of infantry, which constitutes the regular funeral escort of honor for the highest officer in the service.

“After the performance of a funeral dirge by Birgfield by the band, an eloquent prayer was delivered by Rev. Mr. Stockton.

“Mr. Everett then commenced the delivery of his oration, which was listened to with marked attention throughout.

“Although a heavy fog clouded the heavens in the morning during the procession, the sun broke out in all its brilliancy during the Rev. Mr. Stockton’s prayer, and shone upon the magnificent spectacle. The assemblage was of great magnitude, and was gathered within a circle of great extent around the stand, which was located on the highest point of ground on which the battle was fought. A long line of military surrounded the position taken by the immense multitude of people.

“The marshal took up a position on the left of the stand. Numerous flags and banners, suitably draped, were exhibited on the stand and among the audience. The entire scene was one of grandeur due to the importance of the occasion. So quiet were the people that every word uttered by the orator of the day must have been heard by them all, notwithstanding the immensity of the concourse.

“Dedicatory Speech of the President.

“The President then delivered the following dedicatory speech:

“‘Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth upon this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. (Applause.) Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We are met to dedicate a portion of it as the final resting place of those who here gave their lives that that nation might live.

“‘It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But in a larger sense we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here have consecrated it far above our power to add or detract. (Applause.) The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. (Applause.) It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work that they have for us so far, nobly carried on. (Applause.)  It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us, that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion, that we here highly resolve that the dead shall not have died in vain (applause); that the nation shall, under God, have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, and for the people shall not perish from the earth.’ (Long continued applause.)

“Three cheers were here given for the President and the Governors of the States.

“After the delivery of this address, the dirge and the benediction closed the exercises, and the immense assemblage departed at about 4 o’clock.”

Historical newspapers are not only a great way to learn about the lives of your ancestors—they also help you understand the times your ancestors lived in, and the news they talked about and read in their local papers.

Did any of your ancestors fight in the Battle of Gettysburg or meet Abraham Lincoln? Share your family stories with us in the comments.

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Oklahoma Archives: 55 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Yesterday was the 107th anniversary of Oklahoma’s statehood: on 16 November 1907 the Union admitted its 46th state when Indian Territory and Oklahoma Territory combined to form the new state of Oklahoma. Residents throughout the state celebrated with wild jubilation and a “red letter” campaign.

As explained in an article published by the Hobart Daily Republican (Hobart, Oklahoma) on 16 November 1907:

The commercial bodies and immigration organizations of the state have assisted in making this a “red letter day” in fact as well as in name by printing thousands of red letters announcing the resources and opportunities of the new commonwealth. These have been distributed all over the state and are being mailed by Oklahomans today to their relatives and friends in other states.

photo of the Ouachita Mountains in southeastern Oklahoma

Photo: Ouachita Mountains in southeastern Oklahoma. Credit: Okiefromokla; Wikipedia.

Also, did you know that the name of the state originated from a Muskogean Indian word? “Oklahoma” comes from the Choctaw words “oklah homma,” which means “red people.” Many Indian tribes including Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw and Seminole reside in Oklahoma today because Oklahoma was designated by the U.S. government as “Indian territory” in the Indian Removal Act of 1830.

If you are researching your ancestry from Oklahoma, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online Oklahoma newspaper archives: 55 titles to help you search your family history in the “Sooner State,” providing coverage from 1871 to Today. There are more than 2.8 million newspaper articles and records in our online OK archives! Oklahoma is particularly rich in Native American newspapers given the state’s history, which resulted in one of our nation’s largest populations of American Indian people.

Dig deep into the online archives and search for obituaries and other news articles about your ancestors in these recent and historical OK newspapers online. Our Oklahoma newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search Oklahoma Newspaper Archives (1871 – 1923)

Search Oklahoma Recent Obituaries (1982 – Current)

Here is our complete list of online Oklahoma newspapers in the archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The OK newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range Collection
Ada Ada Evening News 10/29/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Altus Altus Times 1/14/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Alva Alva Review-Courier 9/5/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Antlers Antlers American 10/14/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ardmore Daily Ardmoreite 12/1/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bartlesville Bartlesville Examiner-Enterprise 10/18/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bethany Bethany Tribune 12/7/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chickasha Express Star 3/31/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Claremore Claremore Daily Progress 7/3/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Duncan Duncan Banner 4/26/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Durant Durant Daily Democrat 5/29/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Edmond Edmond Sun 10/24/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Enid Enid News and Eagle 8/1/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fairland American 10/4/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Frederick Frederick Press-Leader 12/3/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Grove Grove Sun 2/25/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Guymon Guymon Daily Herald 5/30/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hobart Hobart Daily Republican 1/4/1907 – 6/30/1920 Newspaper Archives
Hobart Hobart Weekly Chief 7/2/1908 – 12/31/1908 Newspaper Archives
Hobart Hobart Democrat 1/10/1908 – 7/1/1909 Newspaper Archives
Langston Langston City Herald 11/14/1891 – 3/30/1893 Newspaper Archives
Lawton Lawton Constitution 10/1/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
McAlester McAlester News-Capital & Democrat 12/4/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Miami Miami District Daily News 8/19/1917 – 1/31/1923 Newspaper Archives
Miami Miami Record-Herald 7/28/1899 – 10/9/1903 Newspaper Archives
Miami Miami Weekly Herald 9/23/1899 – 11/20/1903 Newspaper Archives
Miami Miami News-Record 12/3/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Midwest City Midwest City Sun 7/10/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Moore American 1/3/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Muskogee Muskogee Daily Phoenix and Times-Democrat 2/18/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Norman Norman Transcript 9/19/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Nowata Nowata Star 10/3/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Oklahoma City Daily Oklahoman 1/25/1898 – 12/31/1913 Newspaper Archives
Oklahoma City Guide 10/6/1898 – 8/1/1903 Newspaper Archives
Oklahoma City Oklahoman 11/1/1982 – Current Recent Obituaries
Oklahoma City Oklahoman, The: Web Edition Articles 12/14/2013 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pauls Valley Pauls Valley Daily Democrat 9/8/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pawhuska Pawhuska Journal-Capital 10/17/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Perry Perry Republican 1/1/1914 – 12/28/1922 Newspaper Archives
Perry Noble County Sentinel 10/3/1901 – 9/1/1904 Newspaper Archives
Perry Perry Daily Journal 12/4/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Poteau Poteau Daily News & Sun 7/29/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pryor Daily Times 12/26/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Shawnee Shawnee News-Star 10/2/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Stillwater Stillwater News Press 9/11/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tahlequah Cherokee Advocate 4/29/1871 – 7/3/1897 Newspaper Archives
Tahlequah Tahlequah Daily Press 12/29/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tulsa Tulsa World 1/1/1911 – 12/31/1922 Newspaper Archives
Tulsa Tulsa World 1/1/1989 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tulsa Native American Times 10/27/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tuttle Tuttle Times 3/29/2006 – 1/27/2010 Recent Obituaries
Vinita Vinita Daily Journal 11/10/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Waurika Waurika News Democrat 2/11/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Weatherford Weatherford Daily News 11/27/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Woodward Woodward News 4/26/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference—all the Oklahoma newspaper links will be live.

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1918 Surrender of Germany Ends WWI & Veterans Rejoice

No one called it World War I at the time—for it did not seem possible there could ever be a second. Instead, they called it the “Great War” or the “War to End All Wars.” In a little over four years of combat, more than 70 million soldiers were mobilized around the world and over 9 million were killed. Finally, German officials signed an armistice in November 1918, and on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, the ceasefire began and hostilities ended.

photo of American soldiers of the U.S. 64th Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, celebrating the news of the Armistice, 11 November 1918

Photo: American soldiers of the U.S. 64th Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, celebrating the news of the Armistice, 11 November 1918. Source: U.S. National Archive; Wikimedia Commons.

Nearly a century has now passed since the end of WWI, and the modern world may be losing sight of how traumatized the world was in 1918. But the press certainly knew it then, as the headline from the following newspaper article flatly declares: “Curtain Rolls Down on Most Stupendous Tragedy of History.”

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WWI irrevocably changed the world. It ushered in the era of modern warfare, with such innovations as tanks, chemical weapons and airplanes. It destroyed two powerful empires, the Austro-Hungarian and the Ottoman, and the Russian Empire was torn down by revolutionary forces that eventually led to the Soviet Union. Germany was shackled, causing resentment that helped fuel the rise of Hitler and the Nazis. After the conflict ended the world’s map was redrawn, especially in Central Europe and the Middle East. Despite the conviction of many that the “War to End All Wars” had taught humanity a lasting if distressing lesson (and the League of Nations was formed to implement this lesson), WWII began just 21 years later.

The signing of the armistice ending WWI was, of course, huge news all around the world, as shown by this front page newspaper article.

article about the armistice ending World War I, Bellingham Herald newspaper article 11 November 1918

Bellingham Herald (Bellingham, Washington), 11 November 1918, page 1

Do you have any family stories about your ancestors who fought in, or were affected by, World War I? Tell us about them in the comments section.

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Annie Edson Taylor: 1st Person to Barrel down Niagara Falls

For years, male daredevils had gained fame and fortune by daring to brave the rapids near Niagara Falls while floating in barrels—being very careful not to go over. However, it was a destitute, widowed, female school teacher who took the ultimate plunge: on 24 October 1901 Annie Edson Taylor became the first person to go over Niagara Falls in a barrel. Although suffering a scalp wound and some bruises, she survived her daring feat without any broken bones—but, as noted in the newspaper article below, she was “somewhat hysterical” after taking her plunge. And little wonder!

photo of Annie Edson Taylor, the first person to go over Niagara Falls in a barrel

Photo: Annie Edson Taylor. Source: Francis J. Petrie Photograph Collection; Wikimedia Commons.

Taylor claimed to be in her 40s, but her historic adventure actually occurred on her 63rd birthday. In front of a mocking crowd she went over the falls in a large pickle barrel, using cushions for padding. The press reported her astonishing feat, and she went on a speaking tour to capitalize on her sudden fame. Sadly, that fame proved fleeting and no fortune rewarded her efforts; she died poor at the age of 82 on 29 April 1921 at the Niagara County Infirmary.

article about Annie Edson Taylor, the first person to go over Niagara Falls in a barrel, Boston Journal newspaper article 25 October 1901

Boston Journal (Boston, Massachusetts), 25 October 1901, page 1

The old newspaper article reported:

“Niagara Falls, N.Y., Oct. 24.—Mrs. Annie Edson Taylor, 50 years old, went over Niagara Falls on the Canadian side this afternoon and survived, a feat never before accomplished and, indeed, never attempted except in the deliberate commission of suicide. She made the trip in a barrel. Not only did she survive, but she escaped without a broken bone, her only apparent injuries being a scalp wound one and one-half inches long, a slight concussion of the brain, slight shock to her nervous system and bruises about the body. She was conscious when taken out of the barrel. The doctors in attendance upon her tonight said that, though she was somewhat hysterical, her condition is not at all serious and that she probably will be out of bed within a few days.

To the Abyss and Over

“Mrs. Taylor’s trip covered a mile ride through the Canadian rapids before she reached the brink of the precipice. Her barrel, stanch as a barrel could be made, was twirled and tossed and buffeted through those delirious waters but escaped serious contact with rocks. As it passed through the smoother, swifter waters that rushed over into the abyss it rode in an almost perpendicular position with its upper half out of the water. As it passed over the brink it rode at an angle of about 45 degrees on the outer surface of the deluge and descended as gracefully as a barrel can descend to the white foaming waters 158 feet below. True to her calculations, the anvil fastened to the bottom of the barrel kept it foot downward, and so it landed. Had it turned over and landed on its head, Mrs. Taylor’s head must have been crushed in and her neck broken.

After the Drop

“The ride through the rapids occupied 18 minutes. It was 4:23 o’clock when the barrel took its leap. It could not be seen as it struck the water below, because of the spray, but in less than half a minute after it passed over the brink it was seen on the surface of the scum-covered water below the falls. It was carried swiftly down to the green water beyond the scum, then half-way to the Maid of the Mist Landing. It was caught in what is known as the Maid of the Mist Eddy and held there until it floated so close to the shore that it was reached by means of a pole and hook and drawn in upon the rocks, at 4:40 o’clock or 17 minutes after it shot the cataract.

“Ten minutes later the woman was lifted from the barrel, and half an hour later she lay on a cot on First Street, in Niagara Falls, on the American side.

“She thanked God she was alive, thanked all who had helped her in any way, said she would never do it again, but that she was not sorry she had done it, ‘if it would help her financially.’

Few Moments Unconscious

“She said she had prayed all during the trip except during ‘a few moments’ of unconsciousness just after her descent. The barrel in which Mrs. Taylor made the journey is 4½ feet high and about 3 feet in diameter. A leather harness and cushions inside protected her body. Air was secured through a rubber tube connected with a small opening near the top of the barrel.

“Mrs. Taylor is a school teacher and recently came here from Bay City, Mich.”

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To date she is the first and only woman to ever go down Niagara Falls in a barrel.

article about Annie Edson Taylor, the first person to go over Niagara Falls in a barrel, Centre Daily Times newspaper article 12 January 1976

Centre Daily Times (State College, Pennsylvania), 12 January 1976, page 7

Did any of your female ancestors pull off a remarkable daredevil stunt that made the news? Tell us about them in the comments section.

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Odd & Hilarious Names: You Responded with Your Funniest Finds

Last week, we posed this question to our GenealogyBank friends on Facebook: “What’s the funniest name or surname you’ve ever come across?”

Well, your responses were wonderful: 98 of you have commented so far sharing your funniest name finds! We enjoyed some laughs reading these names so much that we decided to compile them into one list to give everyone a chuckle. Some of these people’s names seem too outlandish or funny to be real—but, time and again, you appended messages swearing that this is “really, truly” a name you’ve encountered in your family history research.

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Here is that list of funny names—and thank you all, readers, for sharing these crazy names with us. The parents of these people clearly had a sense of humor! If anyone reading this has more funny names to contribute, please join in on the fun by posting them in the comments section below or on Facebook. (Keep the names family-friendly, please.)

And we couldn’t leave without contributing one hilarious name we encountered while doing research in this 1799 Massachusetts newspaper. Joseph Maxfeld ran an ad announcing the dissolution of his partnership—with a man named Preserved Fish!

ad announcing the dissolution of the firm Fish and Maxfeld, Columbian Courier newspaper advertisement, 1 May 1799

Columbian Courier (New Bedford, Massachusetts), 1 May 1799, page 1

Here’s the list of odd and funny names you shared:

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Baseball History: Thomson’s ‘Shot Heard ’Round the World’

It is a cliché to say that a ballclub is a “team of destiny,” but if anyone deserves that title it would be manager Leo Durocher’s 1951 New York Giants baseball team. That’s the club that won the National League pennant in the last inning of the last playoff game on Bobby Thomson’s three-run homer on 3 October 1951, the famous “Shot Heard ’Round the World.”

photo of New York Giants outfielder Bobby Thomson

Photo: New York Giants outfielder Bobby Thomson; image taken from a baseball card issued by Bowman Gum in 1948. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

As dramatic as it was, however, Thomson’s heart-stopping home run was simply the climax of a long string of miraculous events for the Giants and their fans that season.

Long Run of Disappointing Seasons

The New York Giants were a long-suffering franchise when the 1951 season began. For many years a powerhouse in the National League (the Giants’ 15 pennants were second only to the Chicago Cubs’ 16), the Giants had fallen on hard times. They had not won the pennant—the league championship—since 1937, and with the powerful Jackie Robinson-led Brooklyn Dodgers on the scene it did not look like 1951 would end the Giants’ pennant drought, even though in May of that year the Giants brought up a scintillating 20-year-old rookie named Willie Mays.

As expected, the Dodgers were a great team in 1951, and on August 11 the forlorn Giants trailed their first-place rivals by a seemingly-insurmountable deficit of 13½ games.

Drama in Baseball, Aberdeen Daily News newspaper article 4 October 1951

Aberdeen Daily News (Aberdeen, South Dakota), 4 October 1951, page 12

Giants Make a Miraculous Comeback

Then the miracles started happening for the Giants and their fans.

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Astonishingly, the Giants reeled off 16 straight victories to begin their charge, and never let up. They won 37 of the season’s final 44 games, but even this incredible level of play almost wasn’t enough to catch the Dodgers. On the last day of the season they desperately needed a win, but faced the Philadelphia Phillies, the reigning pennant winners. It was a tense game, but the Giants finally prevailed in the 14th inning to tie the Dodgers atop the standings with identical 96-58 records. That brought on a special best-of-three-games playoff, with the winner earning a place in the World Series against New York’s third Major League baseball team, the American League’s New York Yankees.

The first playoff game was in the Dodgers’ ballpark, Ebbets Field. The sun shone brightly and the Giants won 3-1, thanks to Bobby Thomson hitting a two-run homer off the Dodgers’ pitcher Ralph Branca—a hint of things to come.

The next game was at the Giants’ ballpark, the Polo Grounds. The Giants fans’ misery matched the foul, wet weather as the Dodgers thrashed the home team 10-0 to tie the playoff and set up the climactic third and final game, also at the Polo Grounds.

And what an epic baseball game it was! Two of the game’s preeminent pitchers, the Dodgers’ Don Newcombe and the Giants’ Sal Maglie, squared off against each other in a taut pitcher’s duel. After seven innings under gray, threatening skies the game was knotted up 1-1. Then in the eighth the Dodgers pushed across three runs to take a commanding 4-1 lead, and when Newcombe held the Giants scoreless in the bottom of the eighth it looked like the Dodgers were World-Series bound.

Bobby Thomson Hits Legendary Home Run

But the Giants had one more miracle left in this incredible comeback baseball season. Before the first batter stepped to the plate in the bottom of the ninth, manager Leo Durocher said to his players (as he later told a reporter):

I told the boys we had three big outs left. You haven’t given up all year so don’t give up now. Let’s get some runs. And the reply, almost in a chorus, was, ‘we’ll get the bums.’

photo of the New York Giants celebrating after Bobby Thomson's pennant-winning home run, Advocate newspaper article 4 October 1951

Advocate (Baton Rouge, Louisiana), 4 October 1951, page 20

The Dodgers’ ace Don Newcombe was still on the mound, but pitching on only two days’ rest—and he was tired. The first two Giants batters singled, putting runners on first and third. But then the third batter harmlessly popped out, and the Giants’ hopes were flickering. The next batter doubled, driving in a run to make the score 4-2. Dodgers’ manager Charlie Dressen then pulled Newcombe and made the controversial decision to replace him with Ralph Branca—even though the next batter was Bobby Thomson, who had homered off Branca in Game 1.

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Branca fired a fastball past Thomson for strike one.

Then it happened. The overcast skies lightened and the sun broke through. Branca threw a second fastball, but he did not get this one past Thomson. Instead, the Giants’ slugger hit his 32nd homer into the left-field stands, a dramatic, three-run bottom of the ninth home run to win the pennant, a shot forever immortalized as the “Shot Heard ’Round the World.”

photo of the New York Giants celebrating after Bobby Thomson hit a pennant-winning home run, Trenton Evening Times newspaper article 4 October 1951

Trenton Evening Times (Trenton, New Jersey), 4 October 1951, page 28

Thomson was mobbed at the plate by his jubilant teammates while frenzied Giants fans poured onto the field. The Giants, given up for dead just weeks before, had won the National League pennant with one of the greatest comebacks and most exciting finishes in sports history. Though they would go on to lose the World Series to the Yankees in six games, that almost seemed inconsequential—nothing could diminish the excitement and satisfaction of the Giants’ 16th National League pennant.

Giants Top Dodgers and Win Flag on Thomson's Homer, 5-4, Springfield Union newspaper article 4 October 1951

Springfield Union (Springfield, Massachusetts), 4 October 1951, page 1

According to this old newspaper article, written by Dutch Robbins:

“Polo Grounds, New York, Oct. 3—Everybody said it couldn’t be done but the New York Giants did it. They said it all during the month of August and they said it again today after 8½ innings of play here at the Polo Grounds before a crowd of 34,320. Then in the most dramatic finish that baseball will ever know, Bobby Thomson stepped up to the plate and hit a three-run homer that made the rags-to-riches Giants the National League champions of 1951. Thomson’s smash, which will go down in history as one of the greatest clutch wallops of its kind, gave the Cinderella Kids of Manager Leo Durocher a 5-4 victory over the Brooklyn Dodgers in the deciding game of the three-game series to decide the National League flag and it sent them skyrocketing into the World Series against the New York Yankees.

“The Giants have let nothing become a hopeless cause this season. They refused to let their plight going into the last of the ninth inning become one today. They were a seemingly beaten team moving in for their last and final great bid to complete the national pastime’s comeback of all times. The Dodgers were leading 4-1 and only three Giants stood between them and what they had fought their hearts out for. Don Newcombe, Brooklyn’s big Negro mound ace, had things well in hand. Al Dark walked up to the plate. He hit one toward the hole between first and second. Gil Hodges raced over from first and knocked the ball down but it rolled away and Dark was on with an infield single. Don Mueller walked up to the plate and slashed one of Newcombe’s pitches right through first base for a clean single that sent Dark racing to third. The Giants were threatening but Monte Irvin fouled out to first base. Two outs to go for Newcombe and the Dodgers. Whitey Lockman took his place in the batter’s box. Newcombe gave him the pitch he liked and he belted it into left for a double. Dark hustled home and Mueller went sliding into third.

“It was a costly slide for Mueller for he twisted his left ankle and had to be carried from the field on a stretcher. Clint Hartung took his place as a base-runner. Now the tieing runs for the Giants were on second and third. Newcombe was on the ropes and Manager Charley Dressen called in Ralph Branca to try to save the day.

“Thomson was to be Branca’s first victim but instead the Brooklyn hurler became the victim. Branca’s first pitch got by Thomson for a strike but not his next one. Thomson swung. The ball went soaring toward the left-field stands. The huge throng rose to its feet breathlessly and then up went the greatest roar the Polo Grounds has ever heard as the ball dropped into the lower deck of the stands.

“The place became a madhouse as first Hartung crossed the plate, Lockman crossed the plate and last and greatest of them all, Thomson crossed the plate to be literally murdered by everyone even slightly interested in the Giants.”

Historical newspapers are not only a great way to learn about the lives of your ancestors—they also help you understand American history and the times your ancestors lived in, and the news they talked about and read in their local papers. Did you or anyone you know witness Thomson’s “Shot Heard ’Round the World”? Please share your stories with us in the comments.

Related Baseball Articles:

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8 Million More Genealogy Records Just Added to GenealogyBank!

Every day, GenealogyBank is working hard to digitize more newspapers and obituaries, expanding our extensive historical collections to give you the largest newspaper archives for family history research available online. We just completed adding 8 million more U.S. genealogy records, vastly increasing our content coverage from U.S. coast to coast!

screenshot of GenealogyBank's home page showing announcement that 8 million more genealogy records have been added

Here are some of the details about our most recent U.S. newspaper additions:

  • A total of 35 newspaper titles from 20 U.S. states
  • 17 of these titles are newspapers added to GenealogyBank for the first time
  • Newspaper titles marked with an asterisk (*) are new to our online archives
  • We’ve shown the newspaper issue date ranges so that you can determine if the newly added content is relevant to your personal genealogy research

To see our newspaper archives’ complete title lists, click here.

State City Title Date Range Collection
Alaska Anchorage Anchorage Daily News: Web Edition Articles* 12/17/2007–Current Recent Obituaries
Arizona Rivers Gila News Courier* 09/12/1942–09/05/1945 Newspaper Archives
California Newell Newell Star* 12/31/1944–11/26/1945 Newspaper Archives
California San Francisco Corriere del Popolo 03/14/1916–12/20/1962 Newspaper Archives
California San Francisco San Francisco Chronicle 4/1/1917–8/27/1939 Newspaper Archives
Georgia Marietta Marietta Journal 2/22/1990–8/30/1998 Newspaper Archives
Idaho Boise Idaho Statesman* 1/1/1934–6/30/1987 Newspaper Archives
Idaho Hunt Minidoka Irrigator* 01/01/1944–07/28/1945 Newspaper Archives
Indiana South Bend South Bend Tribune: Web Edition Articles* 03/10/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
Kentucky Louisville Louisville Anzeiger* 03/28/1923–05/31/1928 Newspaper Archives
Massachusetts Boston Boston American 4/30/1953–11/14/1960 Newspaper Archives
Michigan Flint Flint Journal 8/19/1915–8/31/1915 Newspaper Archives
New Jersey Egg Harbor City Egg Harbor Pilot 10/08/1864–10/08/1864 Newspaper Archives
New Jersey Jersey City Jersey Journal 11/4/1914–11/4/1914 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Arbeiter Zeitung 12/12/1874–11/01/1895 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Cristoforo Colombo 07/28/1892–07/28/1892 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Eco D’Italia 01/12/1890–11/19/1896 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Fiaccola 04/11/1918–04/11/1918 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Fur Worker 10/17/1916–04/01/1930 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Gaelic American* 10/07/1905–09/28/1907 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Jewish Messenger 03/07/1879–01/21/1898 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Ognisko* 07/14/1887–06/22/1889 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Progresso Italo-Americano 04/08/1886–12/15/1889 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Vorwarts 01/18/1919–01/18/1919 Newspaper Archives
North Carolina Charlotte Charlotte Observer* 8/1/1928–3/22/1929 Newspaper Archives
North Carolina Greensboro Greensboro Daily News 3/16/1974–3/16/1974 Newspaper Archives
North Carolina Greensboro Greensboro Record 11/29/1929–11/29/1929 Newspaper Archives
North Dakota Grand Forks Evening Times 1/14/1910–3/7/1914 Newspaper Archives
Oregon St. Benedict St. Josephs-Blatt* 01/03/1938–01/03/1938 Newspaper Archives
Pennsylvania Philadelphia Momento* 01/27/1917–12/27/1919 Newspaper Archives
South Carolina Murrells Inlet Waccamaw Times* 05/30/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
South Dakota Yankton Dakota Freie Presse* 02/24/1920–02/24/1920 Newspaper Archives
Texas Corpus Christi Corpus Christi Caller-Times: Web Edition Articles* 05/22/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Wisconsin Milwaukee Milwaukee Herold* 01/01/1921–01/01/1921 Newspaper Archives
Wyoming Heart Mountain Heart Mountain Sentinel* 08/25/1942–10/23/1945 Newspaper Archives

More Articles about GenealogyBank’s Newspaper Archives:

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Early American Colonial History Timeline Infographic

Beginning in the 16th century, settlers from many European countries came to North America, including: Finland, Germany, Holland (the Netherlands), Ireland, Scotland, Sweden—and especially England, France and Spain. These settlers arrived seeking a better life, profit, and religious freedom. England eventually exerted control over the new land, and established the 13 colonies that became the United States.

If you are exploring your ancestry all the way back to the Colonial period in U.S. history, this Infographic will help—providing a timeline and facts to help you better understand the times your ancestors lived in.

Here’s a timeline of key historical events in Colonial America. (Note: this article continues after the Infographic.)

Click here for the larger version of the Settling America Infographic.

Early American Colonial History Timeline

Settling America Infographic

Settling America: Explore Your Ancestry in Colonial America

Does your family history in America begin before the United States became a country?

After Christopher Columbus’ voyages, many European countries came to the New World—but eventually Great Britain became the dominant power in North America.

This timeline shows some of the key events in the settling of America, as settlements and colonies became the 13 British colonies—leading to the original 13 United States.

Colonial America Timeline

1492: Christopher Columbus first arrives in the New World
1534: France’s New France Colony (Canada, Louisiana Territory)
1565: Spain’s St. Augustine—the oldest continuously-occupied city in the U.S. (Florida)
1585: England’s Roanoke Colony, the “Lost Colony” (North Carolina)
1607: England’s Jamestown Settlement (Virginia)
1614: Holland’s New Netherland Colony (Mid-Atlantic States)
1620: England’s Plymouth Colony founded by the Pilgrims (Massachusetts)
1625: Holland’s New Amsterdam settlement established on the southern tip of Manhattan Island
1630: Puritans from the Massachusetts Bay Colony establish Boston and 10 other settlements
1636: England’s Connecticut Colony, Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations
1638: Sweden’s New Sweden Colony (Mid-Atlantic States)
1656: First Quakers arrive in New England
1664: England captures the New Amsterdam settlement on Manhattan Island
1665: England renames New Amsterdam “New York City”
1667: England takes over Holland’s New Netherland Colony and renames it “New York”
1681: England’s Pennsylvania Colony
1687: Protest by New England settlers and merchants against “arbitrary” taxes
1690: Spain colonizes Texas
1690: Publick Occurrences, the first newspaper in America, is published in Boston
1754: Beginning of the French and Indian War, France and its Indian allies versus Great Britain, its Colonial militia, and Indian allies
1763: Treaty of Paris ends the French and Indian War—France loses most of its North American territory to Great Britain, with its Louisiana Territory going to Spain

Colonial Newspapers Online

Long-established American families have family trees that stretch back to the Colonial Era in the 17th and 18th centuries. Finding vital statistics and other genealogical information about these early Colonial ancestors from that time period can be difficult, as some vital records simply were not officially kept before and during the 1700s, or have been destroyed through war, accident or the passage of time.

Fortunately, GenealogyBank offers a rich genealogy resource for family historians tracing their family trees back to Early American times: an online collection of 27 Colonial newspapers, providing obituaries, birth notices, marriage announcements, and personal stories to get to know your pioneering ancestors and the times they lived in better.

Download our printable PDF list of Colonial newspapers for easy access to our historical archives right from your local desktop to begin researching your genealogy back to the Colonial period. The list shows the individual Colonial newspaper titles we house in our historical archives, ranging from the first newspaper ever published in America up to publications from the late 1800s. After you’ve downloaded the PDF, click the newspaper titles to be taken directly to the search landing page for that publication. Just click on the graphic below to start your download.

list of Colonial-era newspapers available from GenealogyBank

Sources

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Connecticut Archives: 151 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Connecticut, the southernmost state in New England, is the third smallest state in the nation—yet the fourth most densely populated. The state is named after the large river (the Connecticut River) which flows through its middle, emptying into Long Island Sound. This name comes from an Algonquian Indian word for “long tidal river.”

photo of Western Barndoor Hill, Connecticut

Photo: Western Barndoor Hill, Connecticut. Credit: Sphilbrick; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from Connecticut, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online Connecticut newspaper archives: 151 titles to help you search your family history in “The Constitution State,” providing coverage from 1755 to Today. There are more than 8 million newspaper articles and records in our online CT archives to trace your family tree!

Dig deep into the online archives and search for obituaries and other news articles about your ancestors in these recent and historical Connecticut newspapers online. Our CT newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search Connecticut Newspaper Archives (1755 – 2002)

Search Connecticut Recent Obituaries (1988 – Current)

Here is our complete list of online Connecticut newspapers in the archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The CT newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range Collection
Ansonia, Derby, and Seymour Valley Gazette 12/6/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bethany, Orange and Woodbridge Amity Observer: Web Edition 11/5/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bethany, Orange and Woodbridge Amity Observer 12/6/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bridgeport Connecticut Post 5/21/2001 – 6/30/2002 Newspaper Archives
Bridgeport Republican Farmer 4/25/1810 – 8/11/1876 Newspaper Archives
Bridgeport American Telegraphe 4/8/1795 – 6/6/1804 Newspaper Archives
Bridgeport Connecticut Courier 8/3/1814 – 6/14/1826 Newspaper Archives
Bridgeport Spirit of the Times 10/6/1830 – 9/26/1832 Newspaper Archives
Bridgeport Bridgeport Herald 3/7/1805 – 1/9/1806 Newspaper Archives
Bridgeport Bridgeport Advertiser 6/5/1806 – 1/5/1809 Newspaper Archives
Bridgeport Bridgeport Gazette 6/27/1810 – 1/9/1811 Newspaper Archives
Bridgeport Bridgeport News 3/15/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bridgeport Connecticut Post 9/18/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bridgeport Bridgeport News, The: Web Edition 3/14/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bristol Bristol Press 12/28/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cheshire Cheshire Herald 10/22/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Danbury Danbury Gazette 8/3/1813 – 4/19/1814 Newspaper Archives
Danbury Republican Journal 7/1/1793 – 1/6/1800 Newspaper Archives
Danbury Connecticut Intelligencer 1/31/1810 – 11/7/1810 Newspaper Archives
Danbury Day 5/19/1812 – 12/15/1812 Newspaper Archives
Danbury News-Times 3/14/1996 – Current Recent Obituaries
Darien Darien Daily Voice 5/28/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Darien Darien Times 6/19/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Darien Darien News-Review 10/15/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Easton Easton Daily Voice 6/30/2010 – 6/7/2012 Recent Obituaries
Easton Easton Courier 12/1/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fairfield Fairfield Gazette 10/26/1786 – 9/23/1789 Newspaper Archives
Fairfield Fairfield Citizen News 1/17/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fairfield Fairfield Daily Voice 5/3/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fairfield Fairfield Sun 9/18/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Glastonbury Rivereast News Bulletin 9/4/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greenwich Greenwich Post 10/2/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greenwich Greenwich Daily Voice 6/30/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greenwich Greenwich Citizen 11/8/2002 – 4/17/2013 Recent Obituaries
Greenwich Greenwich Time 8/8/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hamden Hamden Journal 12/7/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hartford Connecticut Courant 10/29/1764 – 12/28/1876 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Hartford Daily Courant 2/3/1840 – 10/25/1914 Newspaper Archives
Hartford American Mercury 7/12/1784 – 6/25/1833 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Connecticut Mirror 7/10/1809 – 12/15/1832 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Times 1/1/1817 – 9/2/1876 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Religious Inquirer 11/10/1821 – 11/7/1835 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Patriot and Eagle 3/7/1835 – 12/30/1837 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Hartford Gazette 1/13/1794 – 3/19/1795 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Times and Weekly Advertiser 1/12/1829 – 12/28/1829 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Hartford Times 2/6/1832 – 8/16/1864 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Connecticut Observer 1/11/1825 – 10/3/1831 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Commercial Record 1/25/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hartford Hartford News 4/4/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hartford Hartford Courant 7/9/1991 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hartford Hartford Advocate 11/7/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kensington Berlin Citizen 6/2/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Litchfield Litchfield Monitor 12/21/1784 – 7/1/1807 Newspaper Archives
Litchfield Litchfield Republican 5/19/1819 – 6/13/1856 Newspaper Archives
Litchfield Witness 8/14/1805 – 6/24/1807 Newspaper Archives
Litchfield Litchfield Gazette 3/16/1808 – 5/17/1809 Newspaper Archives
Litchfield Litchfield Journal 4/8/1818 – 10/20/1818 Newspaper Archives
Litchfield Sun 4/25/1835 – 4/13/1839 Newspaper Archives
Manchester Journal Inquirer 3/8/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Meriden Record-Journal 12/8/1997 – Current Recent Obituaries
Meriden North Haven Citizen 3/18/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Middlefield Town Times 6/30/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Middletown Middlesex Gazette 11/8/1785 – 1/23/1834 Newspaper Archives
Middletown Constitution 12/29/1841 – 12/30/1879 Newspaper Archives
Middletown Sentinel and Witness 1/1/1823 – 8/7/1833 Newspaper Archives
Middletown Daily Constitution 7/10/1872 – 8/5/1876 Newspaper Archives
Middletown Connecticut Spectator 4/20/1814 – 4/10/1816 Newspaper Archives
Milford Milford Mirror 11/30/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Monroe Monroe Courier 3/8/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mystic Mystic Pioneer 3/12/1859 – 3/2/1867 Newspaper Archives
Mystic Mystic River Press 1/11/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Britain Herald 12/1/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Canaan New Canaan Daily Voice 5/28/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Canaan New Canaan News-Review 11/5/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Canaan New Canaan Advertiser 8/8/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Haven New Haven Register 10/23/1878 – 12/31/1900 Newspaper Archives
New Haven Columbian Register 1/5/1813 – 12/30/1876 Newspaper Archives
New Haven Connecticut Journal 10/23/1767 – 2/24/1835 Newspaper Archives
New Haven Connecticut Herald 11/1/1803 – 3/30/1889 Newspaper Archives
New Haven Daily Herald 3/12/1836 – 12/30/1843 Newspaper Archives
New Haven New Haven Palladium 7/19/1861 – 12/31/1863 Newspaper Archives
New Haven New-Haven Gazette, and Connecticut Magazine 2/15/1786 – 6/18/1789 Newspaper Archives
New Haven New-Haven Gazette 5/13/1784 – 2/9/1786 Newspaper Archives
New Haven Visitor 10/30/1802 – 10/25/1803 Newspaper Archives
New Haven New-Haven Chronicle 4/25/1786 – 9/11/1787 Newspaper Archives
New Haven Connecticut Gazette 9/20/1755 – 1/12/1767 Newspaper Archives
New Haven Black Coalition Weekly 3/6/1972 – 9/14/1972 Newspaper Archives
New Haven Fairfield County Weekly 2/17/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Haven New Haven Register 1/3/1988 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Haven New Haven Advocate 11/5/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
New London Connecticut Gazette 11/18/1763 – 5/29/1844 Newspaper Archives
New London New London Daily Chronicle 4/26/1848 – 12/31/1864 Newspaper Archives
New London Morning News 11/8/1844 – 4/25/1848 Newspaper Archives
New London New London Democrat 3/21/1845 – 4/12/1873 Newspaper Archives
New London People’s Advocate 8/26/1840 – 4/26/1848 Newspaper Archives
New London Bee 6/14/1797 – 6/23/1802 Newspaper Archives
New London Weekly Oracle 10/22/1796 – 12/30/1799 Newspaper Archives
New London Republican Advocate 1/2/1822 – 12/10/1828 Newspaper Archives
New London New London Daily Star 1/5/1857 – 8/16/1860 Newspaper Archives
New London New-London Summary 9/29/1758 – 9/23/1763 Newspaper Archives
New London True Republican 7/1/1807 – 2/24/1808 Newspaper Archives
New London Day, The: Archive 7/24/2003 – 12/29/2006 Recent Obituaries
New Milford New Milford Spectrum 10/10/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Newtown Newtown Bee 1/1/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Norwalk Independent Republican 6/17/1802 – 4/6/1803 Newspaper Archives
Norwalk Norwalk Citizen News 12/13/2002 – 11/11/2013 Recent Obituaries
Norwalk Norwalk Daily Voice 4/1/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Norwich Norwich Courier 11/30/1796 – 8/16/1876 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Norwich Aurora 5/15/1839 – 9/29/1876 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Norwich Packet 11/11/1773 – 2/9/1802 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Connecticut Centinel 2/16/1802 – 10/13/1807 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Norwich Republican 10/1/1828 – 4/15/1835 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Weekly Register 11/29/1791 – 8/19/1795 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Norwich Morning Bulletin 10/16/1860 – 8/13/1887 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Native American 3/4/1812 – 6/23/1813 Newspaper Archives
Norwich True Republican 6/20/1804 – 11/5/1806 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Religious Messenger 6/11/1831 – 9/8/1832 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Canal of Intelligence 2/21/1827 – 10/28/1829 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Bulletin 1/28/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Oxford Oxford Gazette 3/6/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Redding Redding Pilot 1/1/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ridgefield Ridgefield Press 6/12/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sharon Rural Gazette 6/9/1800 – 7/13/1801 Newspaper Archives
Shelton Shelton Extra 3/6/2008 – 3/17/2011 Recent Obituaries
Shelton Shelton Herald 12/6/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Southbury Voices 8/2/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Southington Plainville Citizen 8/27/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Southington Southington Citizen 5/14/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Stamford Stamford Advocate 4/5/1829 – 9/24/1903 Newspaper Archives
Stamford Advocate 1/17/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Stamford Stamford Daily Voice 6/30/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Stonington Impartial Journal 10/8/1799 – 3/6/1804 Newspaper Archives
Stonington Journal of the Times 10/10/1798 – 9/17/1799 Newspaper Archives
Stonington-Port Patriot 7/24/1801 – 2/11/1803 Newspaper Archives
Stratford Stratford Star 12/6/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Suffield Impartial Herald 6/14/1797 – 6/11/1799 Newspaper Archives
Torrington Register Citizen 10/25/2007 – 8/2/2009 Recent Obituaries
Trumbull Trumbull Times 12/6/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Waterbury Republican-American 6/25/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Watertown Town Times 8/31/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Weston Weston Forum 12/17/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Weston-Easton Weston-Easton Daily Voice 5/28/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Westport Westport News 9/17/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Westport Westport Daily Voice 5/11/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Willimantic Willimantic Journal 10/5/1865 – 12/13/1866 Newspaper Archives
Wilton Wilton Daily Voice 5/28/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wilton Wilton Bulletin 10/2/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Windham Windham Herald 3/12/1791 – 12/31/1812 Newspaper Archives
Windham Advertiser 5/7/1818 – 3/11/1819 Newspaper Archives
Windham Register 3/13/1817 – 1/1/1818 Newspaper Archives
Windham Political Visitant 5/15/1820 – 5/15/1820 Newspaper Archives

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference—all the Connecticut newspaper links will be live.

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Missouri Archives: 92 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Missouri entered the Union as the 24th state on 10 August 1821. Historically, it was the launching point for America’s westward expansion: the Oregon Trail, Pony Express, and Santa Fe Trail all started in Missouri. This historic role Missouri played as America’s portal to the West is commemorated by the famous Gateway Arch monument in St. Louis. An interesting feature of this geographically-varied state is that it is adjacent to the confluence of the nation’s three greatest rivers: the Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio.

Gateway Arch St. Lois Missouri

Photo: Gateway Arch, St. Louis, Missouri. Credit: Matt Kozlowski; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from Missouri, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online Missouri newspaper archives: 92 titles to help you search your family history in “The Show Me State,” providing coverage from 1808 to Today. There are more than 10 million newspaper articles and records in our online MO archives to trace your family tree!

Dig deep into the online archives and search for obituaries and other news articles about your ancestors in these recent and historical MO newspapers online. Our Missouri newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search Missouri Newspaper Archives (1808 – 1949)

Search Missouri Recent Obituaries (1988 – Current)

Here is our complete list of online Missouri newspapers in the archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The MO newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range Collection
Ashland Boone County Journal 5/13/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Aurora Aurora Advertiser 2/26/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bellefontaine Neighbors Northeast County Journal 12/22/2004 – 8/27/2008 Recent Obituaries
Belton Star Herald 12/14/2006 – 5/11/2011 Recent Obituaries
Bethany Bethany Republican-Clipper 10/26/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Blue Springs Blue Springs Journal 10/29/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Boonville Boonville Daily News 4/2/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bowling Green People’s Tribune 5/4/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Brookfield Linn County Leader 10/5/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Byrnes Mill Meramec Journal 10/24/2004 – 12/2/2008 Recent Obituaries
California California Democrat 10/15/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Camdenton Lake Sun Leader 5/23/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Carthage Carthage Press 10/3/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chesterfield Chesterfield Journal 10/27/2004 – 3/19/2008 Recent Obituaries
Chillicothe Constitution-Tribune 4/6/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Farmington Farmington Press 2/12/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Festus Jefferson County Journal 10/24/2004 – 9/7/2011 Recent Obituaries
Festus News Democrat Journal 10/24/2004 – 11/15/2008 Recent Obituaries
Florissant, Black Jack North County Journal – Northwest Edition 11/24/2004 – 4/13/2011 Recent Obituaries
Fredericktown Democrat News 1/31/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fulton Fulton Sun 3/26/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Grandview Jackson County Advocate 1/4/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greenfield, Miller Vedette 1/13/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hannibal Missouri Courier 1/18/1849 – 12/28/1854 Newspaper Archives
Hannibal Hannibal Courier-Post 12/9/1997 – Current Recent Obituaries
Harrisonville Democrat-Missourian 2/2/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hazelwood Hazelwood-Bridgeton Journal 12/22/2004 – 3/13/2008 Recent Obituaries
Independence, Blue Springs, Grain Valley Examiner 9/18/1997 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jefferson City Jefferson City News-Tribune 3/5/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Joplin Joplin Globe 1/27/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kansas City Kansas City Star 9/18/1880 – 6/10/1949 Newspaper Archives
Kansas City Kansas City Times 5/1/1884 – 1/31/1896 Newspaper Archives
Kansas City Rising Son 1/16/1903 – 12/28/1907 Newspaper Archives
Kansas City Cosmopolita 8/22/1914 – 11/15/1919 Newspaper Archives
Kansas City Northeast News 8/22/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kansas City Kansas City Star 1/2/1991 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kansas City Kansas City Star, The: Blogs 9/29/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kirksville Kirksville Daily Express 8/2/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kirkwood Kirkwood-Webster Journal 10/20/2004 – 2/1/2009 Recent Obituaries
Lake Ozark Lake Today 5/6/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Laurie West Side Star 4/13/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lebanon Lebanon Daily Record 2/6/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lee’s Summit Lee’s Summit Journal 2/19/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Macon Macon Chronicle-Herald 1/11/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Maryville Maryville Daily Forum 1/20/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mexico Mexico Ledger 10/2/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Moberly Moberly Monitor-Index and Democrat 3/27/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Monett Monett Times 3/24/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Neosho Neosho Daily News 10/5/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Noel, Lanagan McDonald County Press 11/12/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
O’Fallon O’Fallon Journal 10/20/2004 – 4/13/2011 Recent Obituaries
Oakville Oakville-Mehlville Journal 10/20/2004 – 7/25/2007 Recent Obituaries
Overland Overland-St. Ann Journal 12/22/2004 – 9/17/2008 Recent Obituaries
Park Hills Daily Journal 6/20/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Raytown Raytown Post 5/9/2007 – 3/26/2008 Recent Obituaries
Rolla Rolla Daily News 1/14/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sedalia Sedalia Times 8/31/1901 – 12/19/1903 Newspaper Archives
Sedalia Sedalia Democrat 7/1/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Seymour Webster County Citizen 2/3/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. Charles St. Charles Journal 2/2/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. James St. James Leader Journal 10/2/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. Joseph Saint Joseph Telegraph 4/7/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. Joseph St. Joseph News-Press 10/5/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. Louis St. Louis Republic 5/31/1888 – 12/31/1900 Newspaper Archives
St. Louis Daily Missouri Republican 3/1/1841 – 5/30/1888 Newspaper Archives
St. Louis St. Louis Palladium 1/10/1903 – 10/5/1907 Newspaper Archives
St. Louis Daily Commercial Bulletin 5/18/1835 – 12/31/1838 Newspaper Archives
St. Louis Weekly St. Louis Pilot 1/6/1855 – 11/15/1856 Newspaper Archives
St. Louis Missouri Gazette and Public Advertiser 7/26/1808 – 9/18/1818 Newspaper Archives
St. Louis St. Louis Enquirer 3/17/1819 – 12/18/1824 Newspaper Archives
St. Louis St. Louis Clarion 12/18/1920 – 4/2/1921 Newspaper Archives
St. Louis Tri-Weekly Missouri Republican 5/2/1853 – 3/23/1858 Newspaper Archives
St. Louis Southwest City Journal 10/20/2004 – 12/23/2008 Recent Obituaries
St. Louis St. Louis Post-Dispatch 1/1/1988 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. Louis Press Journal 10/20/2004 – 12/31/2008 Recent Obituaries
St. Louis West County Journal 2/9/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. Louis South County Journal 2/9/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. Louis North County Journal – Overland Edition 11/24/2004 – 8/31/2011 Recent Obituaries
St. Louis Southwest County Journal 10/27/2004 – 1/27/2009 Recent Obituaries
St. Louis Citizen Journal 1/19/2005 – 3/11/2008 Recent Obituaries
St. Louis South City Journal 10/27/2004 – 7/25/2007 Recent Obituaries
St. Louis St. Louis American 2/1/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. Louis South Side Journal 10/27/2004 – 4/13/2011 Recent Obituaries
St. Louis North Side Journal 10/27/2004 – 4/23/2008 Recent Obituaries
St. Louis Tri-County Journal 10/20/2004 – 1/21/2009 Recent Obituaries
St. Peters St. Peters Journal 10/20/2004 – 4/13/2011 Recent Obituaries
St. Robert Pulaski County Mirror 1/7/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Town and Country Mid-County Journal 10/20/2004 – 4/13/2011 Recent Obituaries
Warrenton Warrenton Journal 2/9/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Washington Die Washingtoner Post 11/17/1870 – 11/14/1878 Newspaper Archives
Waynesville Daily Guide 3/25/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wentzville Wentzville Journal 10/20/2004 – 1/2/2011 Recent Obituaries

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