About Thomas Jay Kemp

Thomas Jay Kemp is the Director of Genealogy Products at GenealogyBank. Tom Kemp is an internationally known librarian and archivist – he is the author of over 35 genealogy books and hundreds of articles about genealogy and family history. He previously served as the Chair of the National Council of Library & Information Associations (Washington, DC) and as Library Director of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania and the New England Historic Genealogical Society. An active genealogist, he has been working on his own family history for 47 years. With the rapidly growing online archives at GenealogyBank – it is a great day for genealogy!

Read the Obituaries of the Cast of ‘I Love Lucy’

The memorable comedy I Love Lucy ran from 15 October 1951 to 6 May 1957 and re-runs are still broadcast today.

photo of the four actors from the "I Love Lucy" TV show

Credit: Wikipedia

They were our television family, watched and enjoyed in living rooms across America.

Read more about the four veteran actors who starred in I Love Lucy in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives. (Note: you must be logged into GenealogyBank to access the content via the links below.)

Lucille Ball (6 August 1911 – 26 April 1989)

Obituary: Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 27 April 1989, page 88.

Desi Arnaz (2 March 1917 – 2 December 1986)

Obituary: Mobile Register (Mobile, Alabama), 3 December 1986, page 12.

Vivian Vance (26 July 1909 – 17 August 1979)

Obituary: Dallas Morning News (Dallas, Texas) 18 August 1979, page 27.

William Frawley (26 February 1887 – 3 March 1966)

Obituary: Dallas Morning News (Dallas, Texas), 4 March 1966, page D5.

What Can I Find in GenealogyBank about My Cousin Maid Marion?

No, I don’t mean Robin Hood’s love interest from the 16th century.

I’m referring to my cousin Marion Morgan Kemp (1862-1963) who owned villas in France, New York and Rome.

Years ago I contacted the authorities in Osmoy, France, where she died and received a copy of her death certificate.

photo of the death certificate for Marion Morgan Kemp (1862-1963)

Credit: Thomas Jay Kemp

Since Marion lived most of her life overseas, I wondered if I could find more details of her life in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives.

I quickly found many old newspaper articles about her that gave me a better sense of Marion’s social and civic activities. She not only hosted many events, but also during World War II—after the Allies retook Rome in June of 1944—she lent her personal villa for the use of President Roosevelt’s representative in Rome.

If you read the news article about the villa takeover carefully, you’ll see that her 60-room villa was highly sought after, causing “a scramble among high Allied officers who wanted it.” President Roosevelt’s personal representative, Myron Taylor, won the right to occupy her prized villa when he showed up with a personal letter from Marion—turns out they had known each other for many years.

collage of news articles about Marion Kemp, from GenealogyBank

Credit: GenealogyBank

Notice where the above three articles about Marion appeared:

  • “Mrs. Coolidge Honored,” Springfield Union (Springfield, Massachusetts), 14 August 1949, page 16.
  • “Sporting Tea in Stable,” Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 9 April 1905, page 8.
  • “Myron Taylor Wins Row over Mansion in Rome,” Richmond Times Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia), 4 July 1944, page 3.

These are terrific articles, published in newspapers from Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and Virginia. Not locations where I had expected to find more information about my ancestor, but pleasant surprises nonetheless.

I had almost limited my record search to only New York newspapers, since that is one of the cities where she owned a home—but I went with a full search of GenealogyBank. It’s a good thing I did— I otherwise wouldn’t have discovered the interesting news articles I found that gave me a glimpse into her life.

Genealogy Search Tip: Cast a wide net when searching newspapers and gather in all of the articles about your family. You never know what you might find out about your ancestors.

More Recent Obituaries Coming Online! Get the List of 32 Titles

GenealogyBank is expanding the obituary coverage next month in our Recent Newspaper Obituaries collection, and will be adding recent obituaries from 32 new newspapers from 10 states: Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.

photo of newspapers at a newsstand

Credit: Wikipedia

Here’s an advance look at these upcoming obituary archives:

Brighton Standard Blade (Brighton, CO)

  • Obituaries: 10/02/2012 – Current

Canyon Courier (Evergreen, CO)

  • Obituaries: 08/28/2012 – Current

Clear Creek Courant (Idaho Springs, CO)

  • Obituaries: 08/29/2012 – Current

Columbine Courier (Littleton, CO)

  • Obituaries: 08/29/2012 – Current

High Timber Times (Conifer, CO)

  • Obituaries: 08/29/2012 – Current

Cedar Key Beacon (Chiefland, FL)

  • Obituaries: 08/09/2012 – Current

Chiefland Citizen (Chiefland, FL)

  • Obituaries: 08/09/2012 – Current

Gadsden County Times (Quincy, FL)

  • Obituaries: 10/02/2012 – Current

Riverland News (Dunnellon, FL)

  • Obituaries: 10/02/2012 – Current

Sumter County Times (Bushnell, FL)

  • Obituaries: 10/02/2012 – Current

Wakulla News, The (Crawfordville, FL)

  • Obituaries: 09/28/2012 – Current

Williston Pioneer Sun News (Williston, FL)

  • Obituaries: 08/29/2012 – Current

Vandalia Leader-Union (Vandalia, IL)

  • Obituaries: 08/30/2012 – Current

Mt. Vernon Democrat (Mt. Vernon, IN)

  • Obituaries: 06/29/2012 – Current

Perry County News (Tell City, IN)

  • Obituaries: 06/29/2012 – Current

Spencer County Journal-Democrat (Rockport, IN)

  • Obituaries: 06/29/2012 – Current

Opinion-Tribune (Glenwood, IA)

  • Obituaries: 08/21/2012 – Current

Carrollton News-Democrat (Carrollton, KY)

  • Obituaries: 10/31/2012 – Current

Casey County News (Liberty, KY)

  • Obituaries: 08/09/2012 – Current

Central Kentucky News-Journal (Campbellsville, KY)

  • Obituaries: 06/15/2012 – Current

Cynthiana Democrat (Cynthiana, KY)

  • Obituaries: 08/29/2012 – Current

Grant County News and Express (Williamstown, KY)

  • Obituaries: 08/30/2012 – Current

Henry County Local (New Castle, KY)

  • Obituaries: 08/29/2012 – Current

News-Enterprise (Elizabethtown, KY)

  • Obituaries: 04/30/2012 – Current

Owenton News-Herald (Owenton, KY)

  • Obituaries: 10/31/2012 – Current

Pioneer News (Shepherdsville, KY)

  • Obituaries: 06/13/2012 – Current

Brunswick Beacon (Shallotte, NC)

  • Obituaries: 07/11/2012 – Current

Herald (Rock Hill, SC)

  • Obituaries: 03/13/2013 – Current

Pageland Progressive-Journal (Pageland, SC)

  • Obituaries: 06/26/2012 – Current

Morgan County News (Wartburg, TN)

  • Obituaries: 6/8/2012 – Current

Roane County News (Kingston, TN)

  • Obituaries: 05/15/2012 – Current

Declaration (Independence, VA)

  • Obituaries: 06/08/2012 – Current

Top Genealogy Websites: Arkansas Genealogy Resources for Records

Are you researching your family roots in Arkansas? Here are some good resources for Arkansas genealogy information online—GenealogyBank and vital records put up by the state itself, as well as FamilySearch—to help with your family history research in “The Natural State.”

GenealogyBank has an extensive collection of Arkansas newspapers online from 1819 to Today.

Search Arkansas Newspaper Archives (1819 – 1999)

Search Arkansas Recent Obituaries (1999 – Current)

Discover a variety of genealogy records and news stories in these 23 Arkansas newspapers:

Search recent obituary records for your relatives in these 55 Arkansas newspapers:

Click on the image below to download a printable list of the Arkansas newspapers in GenealogyBank for your future reference. You can save to your desktop and click the titles to go directly to your newspaper of interest.

Feel free to share this list of Arkansas newspapers on your blog or website using the embed code provided below this article.

In addition to all the vital records you can find in newspapers, there are several collections of Arkansas vital records online to help with your family history research.

Some of the important collections you want to use are:

Arkansas Probate Records (1817-1979)

photo of Arkansas Probate Records, 1817-1979, from FamilySearch.org

Credit: Arkansas Probate Records, 1817-1979, FamilySearch.org

As you can see from the above example, this is a collection of digital copies of the original county probate records.

Currently this collection has 940,000 digital wills and probate papers from the following counties (click on the county name to see the probate record):

Arkansas History Commission: Arkansas Deaths (1819-1920)

The Arkansas History Commission has undertaken an important effort to index multiple sources that give the date of death for Arkansas residents from 1819-1920. They have indexed county death registers, census mortality schedules, obituary indexes, funeral home registers, Confederate pension registers and similar sources.

photo of the online death index provided by the Arkansas History Commission

Credit: Arkansas History Commission

Arkansas County Marriage Records (1837-1957)

This important online collection has more than 1 million digital copies of Arkansas marriage records online. These records were indexed by FamilySearch and the Arkansas Genealogical Society.

photo of the online index for Arkansas County Marriages, 1837-1957, provided by FamilySearch.org

Credit: Arkansas County Marriages, 1837-1957, FamilySearch.org

It’s a great day for genealogy!

Top Genealogy Websites: Utah Genealogy Resources for Records

Are you researching your family roots in Utah? Here are two good sources of Utah genealogy information online—GenealogyBank and vital records put up by the state itself—to help with your family history research in the “Beehive State.”

collage of genealogy records from the Utah Division of Archives & Records Service

Credit: Utah Division of Archives & Records Service

Utah county and state genealogical records are going online. The state’s Division of Archives & Records Service is putting up indexes and digital copies of original records ranging from birth certificates to probate records, and all types of records in between.

Utah has put up a wider variety of records than perhaps any other state in the U.S.

Utah Death Records

Utah has digitized and is in the process of putting online their death records from 1904-1961. These are Series 20842 (Index to Series 81448).

According to its website there are also these records. (Note: the series without links are not available online, but can be searched in person at the Utah Division of Archives & Records Service office.)

  • Reports from Summit County (Utah). County Coroner, Series 3716, contains the death certificates that are associated with the individual deaths investigated in this coroner record.
  • Military death certificates from the Department of Administrative Services. Division of Archives and Records Service, Series 3769, includes death certificates for military personnel killed in World War II and the Korean War, whose bodies were transported back to Utah for burial.
  • Death certificates electronic index from the Department of Health. Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Series 20842, is a computerized index for the death certificates.
  • Burial record from Vernal (Utah)Series 25360, contains death certificates from Uintah County beginning in 1905.

Utah Birth Records

Utah has an index to Birth Certificates 1905-1906 and has additional Birth Certificates 1907-1912 that are not indexed but can be browsed.

According to its website there are also these related birth records online:

  • Birth certificates from Weber County (Utah). County Clerk, Series 20896, includes all live births occurring in the state of Utah as recorded by the Office of Vital Records and Statistics.
  • Birth certificate indexes from the Department of Health. Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Series 81437, indexes the birth certificates (1904-1934) by Soundex code number.
  • Out-of-state births from the Department of Health. Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Series 81442, are birth certificates from other states sent to the Utah Office of Vital Records and Statistics for statistical compilation of Utah residents that were born in other states.
  • Native American birth certificates from the Department of Health. Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Series 81444, are a separate file of birth certificates issued for Indians.
  • Delayed certificates of birth from the Department of Health. Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Series 81445, are birth certificates that are registered with Vital Records a year or more after the date of birth.
  • Amendments to birth records from the Department of Health. Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Series 81446, are forms used to change information on birth certificates, either through error, name change, or subsequent sex change.
  • Birth registers from Emery County (Utah). County Clerk, Series 84038, contains birth certificates filed with the Bureau of Vital Statistics beginning in 1904—but do not become public until 100 years after birth. The researcher should contact the agency.
  • Birth and death records from Weber County (Utah). Vital Statistics Registrar, Series 85146, contains the official copy of birth certificates.

More Utah Records for Genealogy

Utah has also put an extensive collection of records online ranging from cattle brand registration books to naturalization records to probate records. See its complete list of records here.

Utah Newspapers for Genealogy

GenealogyBank has an extensive collection of Utah newspapers online dating from 1851 to 1922 & 1988 to Today.

Search Utah Newspaper Archives (1851 – 1922)

Search Utah Recent Obituaries (1988 – Current)

Discover a variety of genealogy records and news stories in these 8 Utah newspapers:

Search recent obituary records for your relatives in these 15 Utah newspapers:

Click on the image below to download a printable list of the Utah newspapers in GenealogyBank for your future reference. You can save to your desktop and click the titles to go directly to your newspaper of interest.

Utah Newspaper Archives at GenealogyBank

Feel free to share this list of Utah newspapers on your blog or website using the embed code provided below.

CNN Article on ‘Finding Your Roots’

You see genealogy coming up everywhere these days in the national media and in popular culture. It was particularly good to see this recent story from CNN about researching family history.

Finding Your Roots, CNN news report 10 September 2013

Credit: CNN

This helpful article, written by Sarah Engler of RealSimple.com, includes family research guidance and tips from Corey Oiesen, communications officer of the Association of Professional Genealogists.

I particularly like this quote from Corey: “‘People think they can just plug in their grandfather’s name and go,’ says Oiesen. ‘But it will save you a ton of time if you gather a few identifying details before you get online.’”

Good genealogy research advice.

This recent article caught my eye when it gave a shout-out to GenealogyBank as one of the online sources that have “made it easier than ever to trace your roots.” In fact both the Wall Street Journal and CNN recently cited GenealogyBank as an online resource you can rely on.

Both of these articles underscored how easy it is to do genealogy with today’s online tools. The WSJ cites the work of Megan Smolenyak and her group “Unclaimed People” that assist agencies in finding families of the unclaimed in coroner offices. GenealogyBank is proud to be cited in these two articles.

Read the complete WSJ article “Internet Sleuths on the Hunt for Next of Kin” here: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323893004579060051928045642.html

Read the complete CNN article “Finding Your Roots” here: http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/10/living/real-simple-finding-your-roots/

Hats off to both the Wall Street Journal and CNN for keeping the general public informed and current on the latest genealogy resources.

Megan Smolenyak, ‘Unclaimed Persons’ & GenealogyBank in WSJ

Earlier this week the Wall Street Journal ran an interesting feature article about “Unclaimed Persons.” In 2008 Megan Smolenyak started “Unclaimed Persons” to help coroners track down the family details of persons who died without leaving information about their next of kin.

Internet Sleuths on the Hunt for Next of Kin, Credit: Wall Street Journal newspaper article 10 September 2013

Credit: Wall Street Journal

She started this project assisting the coroner of Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, and it has now grown to assist coroners in 40 states. There are over 500 volunteers working on hundreds of unsolved cases.

We were particularly proud to see that GenealogyBank was cited as one of the top Internet sites to comb for clues when doing this difficult family detective work. We are pleased to be assisting genealogists every day, including these genealogical volunteers working to bring closure in the cases of these persons who had lost touch with their families.

Read the complete Wall Street Journal article “Internet Sleuths on the Hunt for Next of Kin” online here: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323893004579060051928045642.html

Finding Out about My Ancestor Jeremy Hanson Using Newspapers

Using GenealogyBank’s historical newspaper archives for my genealogy research just gets better and better!

Every time I dive back into GenealogyBank’s newspapers I look for articles about my family. With over 1.4 billion records to select from—and more added every day—there are still a lot of family finds yet to be discovered.

Recently I was looking for more information in GenealogyBank about my ancestor Jeremy Hanson from Gilmanton, New Hampshire.

Since he lived in New Hampshire and “Jeremy” is a fairly unique name, I started by searching on just his first and last name—limiting my search to only New Hampshire and Massachusetts newspapers.

Finding My Ancestor’s Farm in the Newspaper

I soon found this real estate ad about a Jeremy Hanson who was selling his farm in Gilmanton, New Hampshire, in 1829.

real estate ad for the farm of Jeremy Hanson, New Hampshire Patriot newspaper advertisement 9 November 1829

New Hampshire Patriot (Concord, New Hampshire), 9 November 1829, page 3

Since many of my ancestor Jeremy Hanson’s children were born in Gilmanton, this old news article is probably about him.

The real estate ad says that his farm was “one mile south of the Academy…on the road that leads to Concord.”

Gilmanton Academy?

I drove past that Academy thousands of times growing up in New Hampshire.

photo of Gilmanton Academy, New Hampshire

Photo: Gilmanton Academy. Credit: Wikipedia.

“One mile south of the Academy…on the road that leads to Concord.” A quick Internet search can find that location.

screenshot of Google Maps showing the area around Concord, New Hampshire

Credit: Google Maps

So—now we know where his farm stood in 1829.

Look at some of the details provided in the old real estate ad:

  • 135 acres of “good land”
  • 80 acres are divided into mowing fields, pasture and tillage land

I recognize that type of division.

Our property when I was growing up was further south of where Jeremy’s farm was located, closer to the intersection of State Routes 107 and 129. We had fields that had been planted and mowed since the days of the Revolutionary War. No doubt the Mudgett family that owned our property in days gone by knew Jeremy Hanson back in the day.

There are more details in the historical ad:

  • “Good orchards that make 15 barrels of cider yearly”—so they must have loved their homemade cider
  • “A well of never failing water”—sounds terrific. It’s good to see the ad copy used by people selling a home in 1829. He didn’t just have a well, he had “A well of never failing water.”
  • A home that was a 30’x40’ one-story house
  • A “well finished barn 22 x 49, sound and good”

We can picture exactly how big these two buildings were.

There were also three more buildings on his property:

  • A “wood and corn house, 24 by 30 two stories”
  • A “shed 30 feet long”
  • And “one more out building 15 by 20”

This is impressive. Since I’ve walked these hills and farms for years, I can picture how Jeremy’s farm must have looked.

Finding My Ancestor’s Occupations in Newspapers

Looking at the other newspaper search result hits, I found this article about Jeremy Hanson, the town clerk in Lincoln, New Hampshire.

notice about Jeremy Hanson, the town clerk in Lincoln, New Hampshire, New Hampshire Patriot newspaper article 21 April 1842

New Hampshire Patriot (Concord, New Hampshire), 21 April 1842, page 3

This fits: my records show that several of Jeremy’s children died in Lincoln, Grafton County, New Hampshire.

In another old newspaper article Jeremy is named as the tax collector.

notice mentioning Jeremy Hanson as a tax collector in New Hampshire, New Hampshire Patriot newspaper article 21 December 1843

New Hampshire Patriot (Concord, New Hampshire), 21 December 1843, page 4

Newspapers tell us our family’s story, giving us the details of our ancestors’ lives.

Wow—it’s a great day for genealogy!

More Recent Obituaries Are On the Way! New Obits from 7 States

We are excited to announce that this month we will be adding the following 19 newspapers to our Recent Newspaper Obituaries collection, from Florida, Kentucky, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

photo of a stack of newspapers

Credit: Wikipedia

We thought you’d want an advance peek at the list of newspaper obituaries that will be available to search online soon:

Citrus County Chronicle (Crystal River, FL)

  • Obituaries: 05/13/2008 – Current

Anderson News (Lawrenceburg, KY)

  • Obituaries: 07/18/2012 – Current

Kentucky Standard (Bardstown, KY)

  • Obituaries: 03/25/2012 – Current

Larue County Herald News (Hodgenville, KY)

  • Obituaries: 08/30/2012 – Current

Lebanon Enterprise (Lebanon, KY)

  • Obituaries: 07/13/2012 – Current

Oldham Era (LaGrange, KY)

  • Obituaries: 09/01/2012 – Current

Sentinel-News (Shelbyville, KY)

  • Obituaries: 06/15/2012 – Current

Spencer Magnet (Taylorsville, KY)

  • Obituaries: 08/28/2012 – Current

Springfield Sun (Springfield, KY)

  • Obituaries: 07/16/2012 – Current

Las Vegas Optic (Las Vegas, NM)

  • Obituaries: 08/21/2012 – Current

Los Alamos Monitor (Los Alamos, NM)

  • Obituaries: 05/17/2012 – Current

York Daily Record (York, PA)

  • Obituaries: 06/29/2013 – Current

York Dispatch (York, PA)

  • Obituaries: 06/29/2013 – Current

Chester News & Reporter (Chester, SC)

  • Obituaries: 06/29/2012 – Current

Island Packet (Hilton Head, SC)

  • Obituaries: 03/25/2008 – Current

Lancaster News (Lancaster, SC)

  • Obituaries: 07/02/2012 – Current

Lafollette Press (Lafollette, TN)

  • Obituaries: 06/28/2012 – Current

Bedford Bulletin (Bedford, VA)

  • Obituaries: 06/08/2012 – Current

Galax Gazette (Galax, VA)

  • Obituaries: 05/25/2012 – Current

Top Genealogy Websites, Pt. 6: Search Cemeteries Online

A few weeks ago I wrote about online cemetery records (See: Top Genealogy Websites, Pt. 3: Burial & Cemetery Records). In that article I wrote about the U.S. Veterans Administration’s Nationwide Gravesite Locator, Find-A-Grave, and BillionGraves.

Now I want to show how you can help your family history research by using information from these three websites: Find-A-Grave, GenealogyBank and Nationwide Gravesite Locator.

As shown in my earlier blog article, I gave Find-A-Grave a try by registering and adding the tombstone photo of my great-grandfather John Henry Kemp (1866-1944).

Registering with Find-A-Grave triggered a mini-avalanche of requests by family members and genealogists from around the country asking if I could take photos of their relatives’ tombstones at cemeteries in my local area. In the past week I’ve received almost 20 requests so far and they are still coming in: requests for me to take photos of gravestones in cemeteries all around my county.

Find-A-Grave has a “Request A Photo” feature that lets you ask nearby genealogists to take a photo of your target ancestor’s tombstone and post it to Find-A-Grave.

screenshot of the "Request A Photo" page from the website Find-A-Grave

Credit: Find-A-Grave

So I decided to give it a try and volunteered to be a gravesite photographer.

I received a request to photograph the tombstone of Daniel J. Clifford. They said that he was buried at the Connecticut State Veterans Cemetery in Middletown, Connecticut, in 1997.

First, I did a quick search on GenealogyBank and immediately pulled up Clifford’s obituary, giving me more details about him. He was 86 years old when he died and yes, he was buried in the Connecticut State Veterans Cemetery.

obituary for Daniel Clifford, Hartford Courant newspaper article 25 October 1997

Hartford Courant (Hartford, Connecticut), 25 October 1997, page B3

Next, I searched Nationwide Gravesite Locator to get a quick summary of Clifford’s military service and burial site.

screenshot of record for Daniel Clifford from website Nationwide Gravesite Locator

Credit: U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

It shows that he was a Tec 5 in the U.S. Army and served in WWII. It also tells us that he was buried in Section 81-G, Site 02 in the State Veterans Cemetery.

That is a great feature of the network of military cemeteries: service members are not buried randomly—they are buried in neat, orderly rows. With that section and site number it is easy to go directly to Daniel Clifford’s grave.

So—I headed out this morning to do just that. Armed with my iPad, I went to see if I could actually do this. As you drive into the cemetery you can see the small markers indicating the sections. There was Section 81-G.

Walking the rows I was able to quickly find tombstone 02 in Section 81-G. Notice that the stones have the location code engraved on the back of the tombstone.

photo of the rear of Daniel Clifford's tombstone

Credit: Thomas Jay Kemp

Simple.

Here is his gravestone.

photo of the front of Daniel Clifford's tombstone

Credit: Thomas Jay Kemp

Sharp, clear and easy to read.

Find-A-Grave, Nationwide Gravesite Locator and GenealogyBank are essential tools genealogists rely on to get details of the lives of every member of their family.

Now—another word. I took these tombstone photos for Find-A-Grave with my iPad.

Imagine that.

When I first looked at an iPad I could see no practical value in having one. I could do everything I needed with my laptop—why would I need this extra tool? I quickly found that its always-on Apple software lets me check e-mail anytime, without having to wait for the laptop to crank up.

Now I see that it can actually take photos. Good ones, too.

It was easy to work with. When using it at the cemetery I could easily see the tombstone in the full screen image. It was even easier to frame the photo and to take the picture.

Wow. That was simple.

I have been working on my family history for the past 50 years. There’s always something new to learn.

Last year I learned how to text, to keep in touch with the kids—and now I have an iPad.

Couple this technology with such core tools as Find-A-Grave, Nationwide Gravesite Locator and GenealogyBank, and it’s clearly “A Great Day for Genealogy!”

Read these other blog articles about top genealogy websites:

Top Genealogy Websites, Pt. 1: Google

Top Genealogy Websites, Pt. 2: Google Books & Internet Archive

Top Genealogy Websites, Pt. 3: Burial & Cemetery Records

Top Genealogy Websites, Pt. 4: BillionGraves Smartphone App for Finding Graves

Top Genealogy Websites, Pt. 5: State Vital Records in the U.S.