Genealogy Records Storage: Tips & Software to Preserve Your Family History

After doing family history research for awhile, genealogists reach the point where they ask themselves: I have gathered all this information—now, what do I do with it?

Genealogists are the family hunter/gatherers, sifting through family obituaries, photographs and birth certificates. We take that information and organize it on our home computers in family tree software programs like PersonalAncestralFilePAF, LegacyFamilyTree and RootsMagic.

These family tree software programs designed for personal use at home are excellent ways to manage and organize your genealogical data.

But, at the end of the day, they are only the first step in compiling and sharing your family history.

As genealogists we want to share the family’s information with the rest of the family, to preserve it for the rising generation. We must find a way to make this family history information “permanent” with today’s tools and resources.

What are the storage options open to us?

Storing Genealogy Records at Home

We can protect and keep our genealogical data on a home computer, being careful to make back-up disks and giving copies of those disks to relatives near and far. I have done that for over a decade. The downside is that right now my relatives just are not interested enough in our family history to upload that data. They simply—on a good day—take the disks I sent them and put them in a drawer. The family data is preserved but it is still at the one-off level: it is preserved but only accessible to a few people.

We have seen genealogists spend 40+ years gathering family data, carefully managing it in their paper or computer files—only to have it all discarded as the person dies and the family downsizes, consolidates and moves to warmer climates. The pattern has been that the genealogy records gathered by each generation are known only to a few and are seldom preserved.

It is urgent that genealogists use the report function on their genealogy software programs to print and share their research. These reports can be targeted to report on all descendants of specific parts of the family and can even be personalized so that each person has a copy of their family tree—starting with themselves and going back in time.

Storing Family Records in the Online Cloud

Are there ways that we can preserve our family history information and at the same time widely disseminate it?

Yes.

This is important. Now that we all live in an interconnected world we can easily share and preserve our information with family members we have never met.

Genealogy Tip: For security reasons, only put information about deceased members of your family online. Make that information “public” so that it seamlessly becomes a part of the global family tree being built by millions of genealogists worldwide. If you add what you know—and I add what I have discovered—a much stronger and accurate family tree is built, permanently available online.

Where do I plant my tree online?

You want to use the standard “family tree” websites: FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com

FamilySearch.org. This free site has multiple options for uploading family trees. Their “new” family tree site is still in limited release but is expected to be fully open to the public later this year. Register now to get an invitation. Users can personalize and view this information in multiple languages, including all of the expected European, Scandinavian and Asian languages.

Ancestry.com. This commercial site has millions of family trees with documentation and photographs. It is essential that you make your tree “public,” making the information easily findable by genealogists worldwide.

What about using Facebook, a blog, or other sites?

Earlier I noted that you can print a family tree report from your home-based family tree software—but notice that you can also print these as PDF reports.

Be careful to adjust your settings so that none of the current, living generation of your family is printed in the report.

Then you can easily upload a copy to your Facebook page, blog or similar sites.

Scribd.com

One terrific online resource is Scribd.com.

This free website encourages everyone to publish their reports online. I regularly post copies of my genealogical reports here, and this has paid off. I have heard back from relatives in the United Kingdom and around the world who never would have found me on a “genealogy” site.

Genealogy Record Storage Online with Scribd

Scribd.com for Online Genealogy Record Preservation

How did they find me on Scribd.com? Easy—that site makes every word, every name fully searchable on Google and the other search engines. So—when my cousins decided to start looking at our family tree they searched using Google and Bingo!—they found my family tree report.

One nice feature of Scribd is that I can update my family history information, then upload and overlay the original version of my report. So all links are preserved and the information available will be the most accurate version of my research data.

Take time this summer to find ways to permanently preserve and disseminate your genealogy research. Doing so will inform and entertain your family members—and help your own family history research by getting others involved.

Irish Genealogy Records 1849-1911 Now Online

Irish Obituaries in the Irish American Weekly NYC, NY March 11, 1854

Irish American Weekly (New York City, New York), 11 March 1854, page 2

This Irish genealogy research tip is important. Every genealogist should know this.

Genealogists need to know that Irish deaths and marriages were routinely published in the pages of the Irish American Weekly (New York City, New York).  This fact makes the historical Irish newspaper a great genealogical resource to find Irish obituaries and marriages – that occurred in Ireland – or around the world from 1849 to 1911.

The Irish American Weekly made a diligent effort to find, document and publish these family records in Ireland and published them in the pages of their New York City newspaper.

The old newspaper clipping in the example to the left shows just some of the Irish obituaries reported in the 11 March 1854 Irish American Weekly (New York City, New York), page 2.

Just take a look at the wide geographic coverage that the historical Irish American Weekly newspaper provides:

 

… at Westmeath ….

… at Monkstown, County Cork …

… in Killeshandra …

… at County Wexford ….

… in Cork …

… in Kilkenny …

… in Queenstown …

… in County Down …

… at Norwich, England … formerly of Dublin

… at St. John, Antigua … formerly of Dublin

… in London …

… in Melbourne, Australia …

This NYC newspaper is reporting on Irish deaths in Ireland and on Irish ex-patriots around the world.

Now, look closer at the article. The publication date is 1854. These Irish genealogy records were printed in the newspaper a full ten years before Irish civil registration began in 1864.

Genealogy Research Tip: Registration of Irish death certificates did not begin until 1864 – but you can find thousands of Irish deaths recorded every week in the Irish American Weekly 1849 – 1911 – well before Irish Civil registration began in 1864.

Explore your Irish ancestry in the Irish American Weekly and other Irish American newspapers printed in the U.S. online in our historical newspaper archives at our website.

Using Newspaper Marriage Records for Genealogy: Free Webinar Download

Newspapers are the next big thing for genealogists, with news stories that can flesh out the names and dates on your family tree so that you can better know your ancestors. With over 1.2 billion  genealogy records online, GenealogyBank is the best source for mining old newspapers for engagement, wedding, and anniversary announcements—as well as for divorce records.

GenealogyBank search form for marriage records and engagement announcements

GenealogyBank search form for marriage records and engagement announcements

Download Tom Kemp’s latest genealogy webinar on marriage records to learn handy tips and search strategies, as well as what kinds of marriage records you can expect to find in newspapers:

http://slidesha.re/MKseIt

Practical and timely, this informative presentation will show the research skills you need to get the most out of GenealogyBank’s online historical newspaper archives.

GenealogyBank Has Tomorrow’s Obituaries Today!

We have seen the future and we are publishing it in GenealogyBank today.

Did you realize that GenealogyBank actually includes obituaries that will appear in tomorrow’s and next week’s newspapers?

Along with digitizing historical newspapers, we work closely with newspapers currently publishing. Thousands of newspapers around the country are preparing their copy for tomorrow’s or next week’s issue. As they send their electronic feed to lay out these upcoming issues of their newspapers, they simultaneously send that feed to us and we add it immediately to GenealogyBank. So that is why you will see obituaries here that have not actually been printed on paper yet.

Here are just three of the thousands of obituaries that will be published in newspapers in the coming weeks—but already appear online in GenealogyBank today.

collage of recent obituaries from GenealogyBank

Obituaries that appeared online in GenealogyBank before they appeared in print

Our Acquisitions and Tech Teams are working every day to secure more newspapers to add to our burgeoning online archives. Once a newspaper is selected to be part of our newspaper archives, we work to secure a complete back-run of every available issue of that newspaper. Tracking down every newspaper issue and making sure that it is the best possible copy so that it can be digitized and added to GenealogyBank can take time—often years.

Even when there are still some issues missing from a newspaper title, we will launch that title so that researchers will have the benefit of access to millions more articles about their ancestors. After launching a title, we continue our search for back issues to add.

Every day we add new newspaper titles and fill in gaps for our existing titles, updating and filling in missing issues or adding more obituaries to over 2,900 newspapers a month.

In July we will be adding the obituaries from seven more newspapers from Maryland, Massachusetts and Michigan. These obituaries will be in our Recent Obituaries collection.

State City Newspaper

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Maryland Hollywood County Times, The

2011

Current

Massachusetts East Bridgewater Wicked Local: East Bridgewater

2009

Current

Massachusetts Hanson Wicked Local: Hanson

2009

10/19/2011

Massachusetts Plymouth Wicked Local: Plymouth

2010

11/12/2011

Massachusetts Raynham Wicked Local: West Bridgewater

2009

Current

Massachusetts Raynham Wicked Local: Whitman

2009

11/4/2011

Michigan Homer Homer Index, The

2012

Current

GenealogyBank provides genealogists with the most current and most comprehensive online source for newspapers. Find your recently deceased relatives’ obituaries in our online obituary archives today!

Old West Stories in Newspapers: Here Comes the Morning Stagecoach!

Maybe it was because of Father’s Day, but there were a lot of old western movies on TV this past weekend. Good ones, too, starring Gregory Peck, John Wayne, and more.

Daily Ohio Statesman -  Stagecoach Story Newspaper Article 1860

Daily Ohio Statesman (Columbus, Ohio), 10 May 1860, page 3

So, it was no surprise when I was combing through GenealogyBank today that I found this great newspaper article about an old western stagecoach, published in the Daily Ohio Statesman (Columbus, Ohio), 10 May 1860, page 3.

It read like the plot of a TV western—only these stories of the old Wild West were real.

This historical newspaper article reports that the Overland Mail Coach arrived with passengers “Lieut. Cogswell, of the USA, Dr. J. P. Breck, and Mr. and Mrs. Arnold.”

They brought news from the Texas frontier and points west. “They report the Indians very troublesome in the vicinity of Mustang Pond [Nevada], and between Mountain Pass Station and Phantom Hill.”

The stagecoach passengers provided details of several attacks:

“A blacksmith in the employ of the Overland Mail Company, and three men living at Mountain Pass, were murdered by the Comanches the day before the stage passed there.

“Fifteen Indians stopped at Mustang Pond and committed sundry depredations upon the whites.

“The scout for this stage saw some bands of Indians at the latter place, looking with eager eyes towards the coach, and the passengers prepared themselves for a fight, but the red skins were too wary, and it did not become necessary to fire upon them.

“Col. Fountleroy had started on a tour to select a site for Fort Butler.

“Maj. Ruff had been ordered with five companies of rifles to take the field immediately against the Kiowa and Comanches. His depot was at Fort Butler.

“Several ranging companies were out in the vicinity of Jackborough.”

Clearly, riding a stagecoach in the Wild West was just as dangerous as western movies later portrayed it!

Every stop was an adventure. This old Pony Express Route, April 3, 1860 – October 24, 1861 map (courtesy, Library of Congress) shows the overland route many travelers took from Missouri to California.

Historical Map of Pony Express Route that Stagecoaches Followed - 1860-1861

Pony Express Route, April 3, 1860 – October 24, 1861

The strength of historical newspapers is that they provide a daily record of the past.

GenealogyBank has the largest online newspaper archive, full of details about our American heritage. You can find stagecoach passenger lists, information about the early American pioneers and Native Americans and so much more in GenealogyBank. Carefully review GenealogyBank’s 1.2 billion records for the details of your family’s history.

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Today in History: 200th Anniversary of the War of 1812

In September 1783 the newly-formed United States of America and Great Britain signed the Treaty of Paris, formally ending the American Revolutionary War. Less than 29 years later, however, the two countries were fighting once again when the U.S. declared war on Great Britain on June 18, 1812, beginning the three-year conflict known as the War of 1812.

Despite a much-smaller regular army and navy, the U.S. once again defeated the world’s superpower—aided by the fact that Great Britain was busily fighting the French during the Napoleonic Wars at that time. Having twice asserted its independence, the United States in the decades following the War of 1812 built itself up into one of the richest and most powerful nations in the world.

On this day in history that marks the War of 1812 bicentennial, we remember the brave American soldiers that have served our country throughout its history, fighting to protect our liberty. Historical newspapers are a terrific resource for finding information on your military ancestors and other ancestors who lived in times of war. You can not only find specific details about their individual lives, you can also read about the times they lived in and what wars and other current events were affecting their thoughts and actions.

If your ancestors were living in America on June 19, 1812, then they may well have picked up their local newspaper and read the following article about the U.S. declaration of war against Great Britain—no doubt with keen interest, and perhaps a mixture of excitement and apprehension:

article from the Alexandria Gazette newspaper, 19 June 1812, about the U.S. declaring war on Great Britain: War of 1812

Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, Virginia), 19 June 1812, page 3

GenealogyBank’s online historical newspaper archives contain more than 6,100 newspapers from all 50 states, from 1690 to the present: over one billion articles to help with your family history research!

Search these historical newspaper archives and see what you can discover about your ancestors—and the times they lived in.

Using Newspaper Birthday Announcements for Genealogy Research

Genealogists spend years getting to know their sources. We learn the ins and outs of archives and their collections of genealogical records, looking to get the maximum amount of information on our ancestors.

birthday bulletin for Israel W. Durham from the philadelphia inquirer newspaper 24 October 1903

Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 24 October 1903

In combing through the Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper archives I noticed that they ran a regular feature called the “Birthday Bulletin,” starting in 1903. Generally these newspaper birthday announcements ran on page 2 or 3 and included a brief biography and an etching or photograph of the featured person.

In this example, published 24 October 1903, page 2, an Israel W. Durham is featured. The newspaper article includes his photo, and a brief biography gives us his date and place of birth: “He was born in this city (Philadelphia) October 24, 1856” along with a sketch of his public service and a portrait etching.

Some of these shout-out newspaper birthday announcements are much briefer, like the following four-panel “Birthday Bulletin” published 29 August 1922, page 3, which featured the birthdays of four area businessmen. In this example we can get their date of birth, occupation and a photograph. It can be very difficult locating a photo of our ancestors so it is a real plus when they were published in a newspaper.

birthday bulletins from the Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper 29 August 1922

Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 29 August 1922, page 3

These “Birthday Bulletins” focused on acknowledging the birthdays of established business and public figures in the community. The Philadelphia Inquirer also routinely published “Births” announcing the arrival of newborn infants, such as the following birth announcement, published 5 April 1911, page 10.

birth notice from the Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper 5 April 1911

Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 5 April 1911, page 10

We expect newspapers to publish information about the area’s births, marriages and deaths. It is a bonus when a newspaper creates an additional local interest feature like these “Birthday Bulletins” that is so helpful to genealogists.

When you approach the old newspapers for your local area, take the time to become familiar with them.

Flip through the newspapers and see what features were unique to that paper. Doing so can help you uncover hidden gems to aid in your genealogy research.

The newspaper is your friend—get acquainted.

In my experience we can find genealogical information throughout a newspaper, from the front page to the classified ads.

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More Issues of the Kansas City Star Available in Our Online Archives!

We have rolled out more back issues of the Kansas City Star (Kansas City, Missouri) newspaper.

You may now search old issues of this popular Missouri newspaper from 1880 to 1941.

front page of the Kansas City Star newspaper 8 December 1941

Front page of the 8 December 1941 issue of the Kansas City Star (Kansas City, Missouri)

Here is the front page of the Kansas City Star on 8 December 1941, as war is declared by Congress and America enters World War II.

Each one of the more than 6,100 newspapers in GenealogyBank’s online historical newspaper archives has its own search page. It is easy to search one specific newspaper, a group of newspapers, or all of the newspapers in GenealogyBank to help with your genealogy research.

GenealogyBank search form for the Kansas City Star newspaper (Kansas City, Missouri)

GenealogyBank search form for the Kansas City Star newspaper (Kansas City, Missouri)

Search the Kansas City Star (Kansas City, Missouri).

Southern California Genealogical Society’s Successful 2012 Jamboree

The Southern California Genealogical Society (SCGS) just completed another very successful Jamboree in Burbank, California, this month.

Over 1,700 genealogists jammed the genealogy classes, presentations and the exhibit hall for the past four days.

Our own in-house genealogist, Tom Kemp, spoke at three sessions during the SCGS Jamboree. His Friday Genealogy Jamboree talk (“Newspapers: Finding the Details about Your Family”) was so popular that a large crowd wanting to get into the two-room lecture hall had to be turned away. Seeing this large interest in Tom’s talk, the SCGS conference organizers then arranged for an additional session and he repeated the program on Sunday afternoon.

On Saturday he gave an early morning pep talk: “GenealogyBank Quick Tips.”

More Obituary Archives Online at GenealogyBank!

Last month we added 31 million more records to our historical newspaper archives—and already this month we are working on putting more newspaper obituaries online to keep adding resources for your family history research.

In the next few weeks we’ll be adding current publications of these titles to GenealogyBank’s online U.S. newspaper obituary archives, adding thousands more obituaries for your genealogy research. Search for these recent obituaries from several U.S. locations including Chicago, Illinois, the surrounding Chicago metro area, and many more. Look for these obits to go live online soon on the New Content page.

State City Publication

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Florida Pompano Beach Pelican, The

2012

Current

Illinois Aurora Beacon News, The: Web Edition Articles

2012

Current

Illinois Chicago Chicago Sun-Times: Web Edition Articles

2012

Current

Illinois Elgin Courier News: Web Edition Articles

2012

Current

Illinois Naperville Naperville Sun, The: Web Edition Articles

2012

Current

Illinois Tinley Park SouthtownStar: Web Edition Articles

2012

Current

Illinois Waukegan Lake County News-Sun: Web Edition Articles

2012

Current

Iowa Waterloo Waterloo-Cedar Falls Courier

2001

Current

Maryland Hollywood Calvert Gazette

2011

Current

Michigan Reed City Herald Review

2012

Current

Missouri St. Joseph Saint Joseph Telegraph, The

2011

Current